The journey to winning Geelong 70.3, and how you can too achieve your PBs.

Steve McKenna recently came 1st at the 2021 Geelong 70.3 race and here it is a bit of his story and motivation on how he got there, and how you too can achieve your own goals.

…After historically having terrible luck at Geelong 70.3 (or just poor performances), this one meant a lot and confirmed that the Geelong curse is now long gone!

In 2016 my first ever attempt at the IRONMAN 70.3 distance went horribly wrong and like many races in my first year taking on triathlon it ended up in the back of an ambulance.

I learnt how to swim and ride a bike in 2015 after these two sports were all I could do to rehabilitate a badly broken leg playing aussie rules football (15 weeks on crutches), ambitiously I pulled back on everything in life and decided this would be my job no matter what.

A lot of this confidence came from my first ever triathlon coach Matty White who took me under his wing and said “I’d bet my house on the fact that you’ll go PRO”, that was enough for me, pulled back on University, quit landscaping, got an office job sitting on my arse and started pretending I was a Professional within weeks of my first every triathlon.

Just 12months later I went to Geelong in search of a Pro license, with a Pro field of almost 30 that day I swam 11th quickest overall (23.48min) and cycled 14th (2hrs15), I then ran into around 10-12th place on the run leg and passed out at the 14km mark.

Passing out was a common theme throughout my childhood running long distance at a national level and within my first 12months doing triathlon the theme continued with 3 hospital trips.

My parents often wrote my name, DOB and emergency contact details on my racing bibs – always expecting the worst and pleading with me to pull back a little before the race. Matty White and my current coach can confirm that I don’t have a great gauge on perceived effort, but now that I am very familiar with the ‘passing out sensations’ and when I’m getting close to this zone, being able to push this hard is now a big strength rather than a weakness initially.

After this experience in Geelong I built the race up to be something bigger than it was and under performed in my next two trips here, pulling out overwhelmed and then badly under performing.

In 2020 I was coming off the back of a great 2019 and confidence was high, so things were going well sitting at the front of the chase pack behind leaders Amberger and Appelton. I knew I was on to perform to my potential that day but at the 30km mark my SRAM electric gearing lost it s#it and I was on the side of the road for 5minutes trying to fix the issue. Giving up I took the batteries off and rode the bike as a fixie with 1 gear!

2021 was much different with a coming of age and an apprenticeship in the sport finally finished now! There’s still a lot to work on and I’m not completely satisfied with the performance, which might be the case with anyone aiming high, but all I know is that it felt bloody good and that I learnt from a tactical running error a few weeks earlier at Husky Aussie champs – this time I bought a watch and paced the run well with an even 1st and 2nd run laps averaging 3.22 per km off a solid swim+bike.

Coach Tim Reed (Reedy) has had us both training for Ironman Australia so the fatigue was high coming into this race but we’re both extremely fit and strong from the training so a 1st and 3rd for us was a pleasant surprise!

Reedy is also partnered up with PREPD HYDRATION and even in cooler condition our hydration advantage on the rest of the field certainly plays a big role in our minds.

In our training leading into Geelong we’ve been having PREPD almost every day and the hydration not only allows for better and longer training days but is also recovering us significantly faster. 

 

Just two days after the race I’m right back into training longer again (aerobically for now), but in less than 2 weeks I’m racing Challenge Shepparton, 2 weeks after that I’m racing IM Australia and 4 weeks after that IM Cairns!

My partner and I are due to have our first child in July so I’m not taking any racing for granted and this busy schedule is me making the most of the time I have left in 2021 with maximal sleep time and recovery. I’ve been reassured by many that we’ll handle it just fine, but I’m still going to keep using it as an excuse to train and race like a psychopath until June… being I love it.

To those out there trying to balance work, kids, studies and too much Ironman/endurance training along with pre race nerves these are some of my top tips:

1.Stress less about whether you’re ready or going to get that PB and  enjoy the process because triathlon is bloody fun.

2.It’s all about consistency, if life gets busy but you still found a little time each day to keep ticking boxes and destress with training then you’re still on track. There’s always plenty more races if one preparation went wrong and that long term consistency through the busy times will pay off eventually if you make lifestyle changes permanent and similarly to me.

3.Sleeping well is extremely important.

4.Hydrate all day everyday (and top off your hydration with PREPD).

It doesn’t matter whether you just want to finish your first half marathon, or want to compete in an Ironman, or just simply want to do your cycling training for longer and recover faster. Completely change the way you train and race with PREPD’s unparalleled hydration. Get PREPD today and achieve your OWN goals.

Prepd- Man winning

Steve McKenna’s lead to his Hervey Bay 100 triathlon win

Steve McKenna take us through his mental and physical journey in preparation for the Hervey Bay Triathlon that he ended up winning! Read his journey below.

The lead in:

2020 has been a tough year for many industries and the sporting industry has been hit hard. Triathlon has struggled without a huge amount of money or backing to assist with tackling COVID-19.

A big relief came for the top 100 ranked long course athletes when the Professional Triathlete Organisation (PTO) made a generous COVID payout to help the athletes who had lost their income and they have continued to help the sport through these trying times. Ranked #51 in the world I was lucky enough to be included in the PTO handout.

Currently building a new home and still paying rent, made it necessary for me to take on more work and university studies to make the most of the year to come. With a hobby of coaching other athletes too, I slowly realised I had taken on too much if I wanted to train and recover enough to be competitive in Pro races.

A 4th place finish at Sunshine Coast 70.3 was certainly something to be proud of considering the long weeks leading into Sunshine Coast 70.3 where I would often knock off work at 11pm or 12am and head to the 24/7 petrol station near home to finish homework or coaching before going home and inevitably waking Lauren up (fiancé).

However the 4th place did not live up to the expectations I had for 2020. Making my head space even worse was a DNF at Ironman Cairns where I could not stop vomiting after the swim.

Riding back into town I reflected on how stressed I’d been lately and said “enough is enough”.

This prompted me to review what I had going on with my life at the time, then grading each of them as follow:

University = B (up late rushing my work)
Work = B (rocking up 1minute before the shift with wet hair juggling swim bags and running shoes)
Social/family life = F (Big fail when your friends think you’ve been away – living 10minutes away)
Coaching = B (something I love doing and do not want to see as work or something I have to squeeze into everyday)
Pro athlete = B

The decision I made was to eliminate as much as I could and stop disappointing myself in five areas of life, dialling in on two or three.

I had six weeks until Hervey Bay 100 which I told myself (and Lauren) that I was going to win.

I decided to immediately quit my job and pulled back on University studies (only leaving one exam to complete in the lead up to race day). The result:

University (less of it) = A+
Coaching = A+ (the A+ is for my level of enjoyment because you will have to ask the guys if I actually do a good job :P)
Pro athlete = A+
Social/family life = C (needs work still)

With more sleep, recovery, reading and relaxing techniques added into my days I started training well day in day out and felt stronger and more positive.

The issues I had with anger, frustration or irritability were dwindling away and a life balance was starting to emerge for the first time. It is hard for me to sit on my arse and see any value in simply relaxing (aka wasting time), but I’m getting better at accepting that it’s ok to be unproductive for a minute here and there.

The cherry on top was having the energy to get out of bed early enough to re-join a swimming squad at 5am three times a week and the confidence was growing rapidly.

**Keep reading after image**

Race week:

I was rooming with coach Tim Reed leading into Hervey Bay 100 and it was great to see how a highly successful Pro triathlete treats his race week. As such, I learnt a lot from him.

I learnt that I go to bed way too late and that going to bed at 7pm like the coach can result in feeling amazing the next day. Luckily for me, when I fall asleep I’m out until the morning, whereas Reedy needs these early nights because around 3am he’ll usually wake up and start watching repeats of Vincent Luis race wins.

I also learnt that Reedy and myself have two of the most sensitive guts in pro triathlon and simple tuna and rice meals with a side of Prepd Hydration is something we have in common the night before a race.

With a few fun days leading into Hervey Bay 100 I was feeling relaxed and confident that I would be performing to the standard I had come to expect late 2019.

As we started the swim it was clear that Trent Thorpe from New Zealand (aka the fish) wasn’t someone to chase in the swim and I reassured myself that I would catch him on the bike.

I was left leading the chase pack feeling in control of my effort and despite the choppy blue waters the body was feeling fired up for a quick transition and start to the bike.

Reedy’s advice for this race was to treat it like the Asian races last year, this meant I had to transition faster than anyone, ride the first 10km harder than anyone and then hopefully… ‘out of sight, out of mind’.

The plan almost went perfectly, I was catching Trent Thorpe and getting away from the other Pro’s (besides Lachie Kerin). Lachie is one of the strongest cyclist in every Australian race and can usually drop me on my best cycling days, but today I hung on and even helped push the pace as we passed Trent Thorpe and watched the gap grow to Simon Hearn and more (the runners).

The positive thoughts grew, and the legs continued to feel great, I kept thinking “Fully committing has paid off…. and thank god Reedy made me go to bed at 6:30pm last night”. Lachie did end up pulling away by 40seconds on the last lap and unfortunately for Reedy mechanical issues stopped him from riding up to us.

Off the bike and the lead was around 3 minutes to the chasers once I had caught and overtaken Lachie. I felt great at this stage and if I had access to a TAB and was allowed to bet on myself….. I would have bet my newly built house on getting the win (Lauren would have been fuming).

However, nothing is ever certain in these long course races. With 6km left to run I was close to death, had the horses like you would not believe and wondered whether I’d actually finish at all. I also wondered whether my new house was safe after placing that imaginary bet…. clearly losing my mind too.

Luckily the bad patch didn’t last long and a focus on positive thoughts and aid stations saved the day.

I crossed the line just under two minutes ahead of 2nd place and wasn’t overwhelmed with emotions, just happy I was back to my old self and now know what I need to do to stay there – keep it simple and get A+’s in just a few areas of life, rather than five B-‘s.

Lizard out. Steve McKenna

Prepd- Man walking

Clint Eastwood Last One Standing – Interview with Chris Murphy

WHAT IS THE CLINT EASTWOOD LAST ONE STANDING (LOSER) EVENT?

The race format is a 6.7km lap that started every hour on the hour. You have to finish your lap within the hour and be in the starting corral when the whistle blows to start the next lap or you are out.

WHERE AND WHEN IS THE RACE?

The race was held in Oxley Creek Common, Brisbane South, on August 14th starting at 1.00am

WHAT ARE THE RULES?

Starts

  • Each lap starts precisely 1 hour after the last.
  • A warning will be issued 3, 2 and 1 minute prior to the start of each lap.
  • All participants must start at the bell/horn from the corral (no exceptions).

Laps​

  • Except for restrooms, participants may not leave the course until each lap is completed​.
  • No non-participants (crew) on the course, including eliminated runners.
  • No personal aid during the lap, other than from the aid station at the turn around checkpoint.
  • Each lap must be completed within the hour, including the final lap.
  • No artificial aids, including trekking poles.
  • Participants may utilise the assistance of event crew or other participants crews if available between laps.

Once we have a single participant ‘standing’, he or she must complete a lap alone within the hour to win.

If no single runner can complete a final lap, there will be no winner and thus, all participants will be recorded as a DNF with the amount of full laps completed against their name – if this is the case, the ‘Last One Standing’ will be recognised as such but will be a DNF.

(credits: aaaracing.com.au/clint-eastwood)

HOW DID THE RACE GO FOR YOU?

There were 108 starters that took off on the first lap at 1am Friday morning.

This event becomes more mental than physical the further you go.

I started the event on about 2hrs sleep which wasn’t ideal and had to significantly adapt my sleeping plans – I originally planned to stay awake for at least the first 24hrs. On lap 3 I started to try and get 5-10mins shut eye per lap.

From a PREPD point of view, I followed the advice I got from Tony. Double dose of the Prime the night before, and during the event having a Recover every 5 hours. Throughout the event, I alternated between Tailwind and plain water, and this setup seems to have worked perfectly for me. Once again not one cramp throughout the entire event!

Cold nights, hot days and even a few laps with rain towards the end. Round and round we went until around lap 22 the numbers began to really thin out. Then over the next couple of laps the group quickly dropped to 9, then 8, then 5, then 4, then only 3 of us left.

I was struggling badly from a mental point of view and was hoping for any justifiable reason to stop – but my lap times were still consistent despite taking about 500m each lap to get the legs moving again. I knew my wife would stick to my plan of not letting me stop unless I had a bone sticking out.

As I completed lap 30, I was done mentally and felt like a broken man, despite the body still moving forward. I started lap 31 with the expectation that I would take it slowly, but potentially not make it back in time. But once again I was moving well enough. Until about 1.6km into the lap a toenail brought everything to an abrupt halt. I sat down and took my shoe off to find that I had blisters around and under the toenail which had caused it to start moving around way more than it should and now I couldn’t put weight on that foot in a shoe. Finally having a reason to stop, I walked my way back to the start line barefoot with my shoes in hand. It was finally over.

In the end I had been running for 30 hours, completed 30 laps for a total of 201km. Leaving the two guys to continue without me.

WHO WON IN THE END?

In the end, Ryan Crawford was pushed by Cam Munro to complete 37 laps (248km) for the win in an amazing effort by both these guys.

WILL YOU DO IT AGAIN?

Yes, in fact a cool update following my good result at the Clint Eastwood LOSER. I’ve been included in the Australian team to take part in Big Dogs Backyard Ultra World Championship on October 17th.

Due to COVID they can’t have people travel to America for it so instead are having about 20 countries hold their own team events simultaneously and all events will be video linked… and last one standing overall will be crowned the world champ.  The Australian event will be held in Brisbane again with a 15-person team.  I’ll be using PREPD again and am hoping to go significantly further this time around.

WHAT WILL/WOULD YOU DO DIFFERENTLY?

Having learned a lot from this one, there are a few tweaks to the plan. First one being to get a better night’s sleep before the start. Then obviously taking better care of my feet during the event with more regular shoe and sock changes. A simplified nutrition plan to make things easier between loops and a few strategies to help deal with the midday heat.

My strategy of how I used PREPD before, during and after the event will remain the same. It was simple, and it worked really well. All this will hopefully set me up to go a lot further during Big Dogs Backyard Ultra. But I won’t put a prediction out there other than I’ll just plan to always run one more lap.

*All photos are from – AAA Racing & coaching Facebook page that were taken by Joe Fletcher @joefletcherfilms.

Prepd- Man running

Out Run COVID – Michael Case

YOU ARE AN AVID PREPD USER, HOW DID YOU FIRST DISCOVER PREPD?

I have been following the process of Steve McKenna. From when he first started out in triathlon to going pro. Steve trusted in his results as an athlete and he truly believed PREPD worked for him. As an athlete, you listen to other athletes and their trust in a product, it makes you want to try it too.

WHY DID YOU START THE “OUT RUN COVID, THE BENEFITS OF RUNNING” CAMPAIGN ON YOUR INSTAGRAM ACCOUNT?

I don’t use Instagram to gain followers. I have been in the fitness industry for years and really enjoy running. When Covid hit, I could see the fear in not knowing what to do and the feeling of hopelessness. Suddenly everyone couldn’t go out, see friends and family and go to the gym. But we could run.  It’s always hard to know what to do, but one thing I know for sure, is that exercise will always be the best option for for physical and mental health. Running is one of the greatest gifts we have. It is truly universal, (almost) everyone can do it and it’s easily done in isolation.

I am lucky enough to have been a part of hundreds and hundreds of running journeys (with clients) over the years; as much as I love programming athletes and recreational runners to improve and enjoy their running more, my greatest joy comes from inspiring others to take up running in whatever form suits their body, circumstances and goals.

Now more than ever, we need to inspire others to find a way to lace up, step outside (safely) and feel the joy of running. So I decided to post one running photo a day with a different benefit of what running can do for you. It’s a project I feel strongly about and one that I hope people share to help others through this strange time. If it inspires, educates, resonates or helps anyone in anyway, it will be entirely worth it.

WHAT WAS THE REACTION/S TO THE CAMPAIGN?

I had a lot of private messages from friends, family and former clients saying thank you for getting them motivated and inspired to run again or just to try running for the first time. Some of the people who contacted me had never spoken to me about running, were now talking to me and asking me lots of questions about running. I tried to educate them on key points about running from their questions. Like “which pair of shoes should I buy?” I would recommend that they get properly fitted and not worry about the brand or colour they wear, but rather about what shoe is best for their foot and running style.

Also running doesn’t mean hurting. A lot of people would consider running as a painful exercise, but talking to them I could explain that even a gentle jog is a great way to run.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE THING ABOUT RUNNING?

The mental health side of running is my favourite benefit of running. I find running a stress relief and it gives me happiness. There is nothing like a tough week at work and then going for a run. That feeling of all just melting away.

YOU’VE BEEN IN THE FITNESS INDUSTRY FOR A LONG TIME NOW. ARE THERE SKILLS OR THINGS YOU’VE LEARNT FROM TRIATHLON TRAINING THAT ARE TRANSFERABLE INTO YOUR DAY TO DAY ROLE?

The main skills that are transferable are consistency, dedication and commitment. As a personal trainer and a triathlete you must keep up your training, over a long period of time. You also need the support of your family and friends. Client rapport is the same.

ARE YOU ABLE TO TELL US ABOUT AN AVERAGE DAY FOR YOU & YOUR FITNESS ROUTINE?

Even before covid a usual day doesn’t exist for me. But I try to train 3-4 hours a day (or 20-24 hours per week). Every morning and every evening, I will run, ride, swim or gym. Covid means that servicing clients is more online now with new software and videos.

Nutrition is key and involves a lot of eating (oats, yoghurt, fruit, veggies, meat and pasta). An easy session means I will drink lots of water and fluid during the day but a hard session means I need PREPD. I drink a PREPD Prime as my dessert after a meal and it’s even more delicious with the chocolate flavour now! The PREPD Recover is my favourite part of finishing training.

HOW DID YOU GET INTO TRIATHLONS AND IRONMAN?

I did my first duathlon at the age of 18 years old and my first triathlon in my early 20s. I remember getting into the pool and the length was 25 metres. I thought I was going to drown,  even though I could stand up, I still felt the panic! So I was no good at the start but I kept going and kept training, until I could.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE THINKING ABOUT DOING THEIR FIRST IRONMAN?

I think that people all give advice which relates to them. I remember when I went to my first Ironman and I heard Liz Blatchford interviewed live on stage (an English professional triathlete). Liz placed third at the 2013 and 2015 Ironman World Championships, so I was really interested in what she had to say. She was asked the same question of what advice would you give someone thinking about doing their first Ironman?

Liz’s answer helped me the very next day, when my bike gears broke and the weather blew in hard. “Just aim to finish the race. Anything can go wrong on the day and it’s a long event, so don’t worry about times or where you are in the race, just finish. If you cross that finish line, you will forever be an Ironman and no one can take that away from you. So just aim to finish. Then next time you can time it.”

DO YOU HAVE SOMEONE WHO YOU FOLLOW ONLINE OR A PROGRAM THAT HELPS YOU TO MEET YOUR GOALS?

Matty White is my coach and the support I need, as I can coach myself to a point, but Matty gives me programs that he knows I can do, but need.

IN THE WORLD OF TRIATHLONS, WHAT IS ON YOUR BUCKET LIST?

#1 – My key goal is to represent Australia at the world championships. I have a watch band that I changed to green and gold. I did it to remind me that when I am struggling and things aren’t going my way in my training, that is why I am doing this. I am almost there and I am going to represent Australia in September 2021.

#2 – 70.3 Championships

#3 – Kona, the holy grail.

TO FIND AND FOLLOW MICHAEL CASE ON INSTAGRAM – SEE THE LINK BELOW

Prepd- Woman putting hands together

From Smoker to 10 time Ironman Finisher

HOW DID YOU GET INTO IRONMAN EVENTS AND ULTRA MARATHONS?

I smoked heavily for over 20 years and finally managed to quit 12 years ago. I started running to get fit and did the Melbourne Marathon in 2010. In 2012 my brother suggested that we (my boyfriend and I) all do the Cairns Ironman 70.3 together. I said, “Sure, what’s an Ironman? How hard can it be?” Well, pretty hard! We trained for nearly a year for the race. I absolutely loved it and the next day my boyfriend and I signed up for the full Ironman in Port Macquarie. We went onto racing 6 more 140.6 and 10 x 70.3 races together around Australia, over the next 7 years.

In 2018 I went onto Lite n Easy and lost 11 kilos and I was even on the Lite n Easy ads around Australia in 2019!  My training and racing improved dramatically.

After the 2019 Pt Macquarie Ironman, I found I had lost my love for the sport but my love for running was still strong, so when we got home from the race, I signed up for the Yurrebilla ultra trail marathon. The race is 56kms of steep, rocky trails through the Adelaide hills.  Again, I had no idea what I was in for, but if training for and finishing 7 Ironman races has taught me anything, it’s that I am made of tough stuff. I finished this ultra and then decided I was ready to tackle Ironman again, so now have my sights set on Ironman Western Australia in December 2020, the day after my 50th birthday.

YOU ARE A 7 TIME IRONMAN FINISHER, 10XHALF IRONMAN FINISHER, AND AN ULTRA MARATHON RUNNER. HOW DO YOU HAVE TIME TO HAVE TIME TO WORK AS PAEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE REGISTERED NURSE?

I’m not quite full time, but I do work a lot of hours! I’m a very focused person and also very stubborn as my boyfriend will attest to! When I put my mind to something, I am single minded about achieving this, and I can honestly say this comes from all my training and racing Ironman. I never realised that I had this kind of determination prior to Ironman.

ARE YOU ABLE TO TELL US ABOUT AN AVERAGE DAY FOR YOU AND YOUR ROUTINE?

On a working day I get up at around 4.20am and run for about 8-9kms before I leave for work and do a 7.00am – 7.30pm shift. I am absolutely exhausted by the time I get home as nursing in Intensive Care is a very physically and emotionally demanding job. I have a glass of wine, eat dinner and go to bed as I usually have to get up and do it all again the next day.

On my days off I usually have a sleep in and then get up and study for a few hours as I’m currently studying my Bachelor of Criminology. I then head out into the trails for a long run, or to the outdoor pool at my gym for a swim no matter the weather. If the weather permits, I’ll go for a ride. I actually prefer swimming and running in winter as I always get a lane to myself at the outdoor pool, but I’m not a huge fan of road riding, so I often train indoors. The trails are so pretty in the colder months and I don’t have to worry about snakes!

WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES IN TRYING TO JUGGLE BOTH ENDURANCE RACING/TRAINING AND WORK?

I have to really prioritise my time and when I make a decision or commit to training and a race, I stick to it. I have very understanding friends and family, as quite often I’m exhausted after working and training and don’t have the energy to catch up as often as we would like. I plan out my weeks and know what I have to do, including study, work and training. I’m quite regimented about it and I’m lucky to have such supportive, wonderful people around me who know how much I get out of my training and racing. I couldn’t do it without them.

The biggest challenge is time. I’m always tired and feel (like many people) that I race from one thing to another. Getting up at 4.20am most mornings isn’t my favourite thing to do, but I always remind myself of how good I feel when I’m racing and cross that line to the words “Kate Allan, you are an Ironman”. It is indescribable and addictive. There is no better feeling than being really fit.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE THINKING ABOUT DOING THEIR FIRST IRONMAN, 70.3 OR AN ULTRA MARATHON?

Sign up and do it! If I can do it anyone can! I’ll never win, in fact I’m often near the back of the pack but that isn’t what it’s about in my mind. Ironman and Ultras have taught me that I can do anything I put my mind to. It has given me so much confidence in my choices and decisions in life, and I am a better person for it. When you push your body and mind to the absolute limit over a 15-hour race, not to mention all the months of training leading up to it, you find that you are capable of more than you ever imagined. It has transferred to other areas in my life – I’m back studying again and have taken steps in my career that I hadn’t thought possible prior to Ironman.

If you want to do it, sign up and commit to it. Prepare to suffer and prepare to sacrifice, but it’s worth it. Set yourself training goals every day over the weeks and months leading to the race and stick to them. Tell people you’re doing it. I find that if I tell friends and family of my plans, then I’m more accountable and have to do it! Thank those around you who support you and understand your complete and utter obsession with Ironman and Ultras, because trust me, it will happen. It’s like a drug. Enjoy the day, smile and thank all the volunteers, be kind, courteous and don’t litter out on the course.

Don’t lose sight of why you’re racing and savour every moment.

IF YOU HAD TO CHOOSE, WHICH IS YOUR FAVOURITE – TRIATHLON RACING OR RACING AN ULTRA MARATHON AND WHY?

Definitely Ironman, hands down. There is no better feeling than crossing that line with the lights, music pumping and hundreds of people cheering. Running down that finishers shute are without doubt the greatest moments of my life. I will never forget that feeling. It makes the hundreds and hundreds of hours of training and sacrifice worth it.

I absolutely love ultra-trail running too. Funnily enough I love the training as much if not more than the race itself.  Running for hours on trails in the hills, seeing no one but birds, kangaroos and koalas is the best way to spend a day, but Ironman will always be my true love.

HOW MUCH OF AN ISSUE IS DEHYDRATION FOR YOU AND WHAT ARE THE IMPACTS?

Obviously when you are racing for 15 hours dehydration is a massive concern, especially in some of the places we race like Western Australia where it is hot and dry. I sometimes train for up to 6 hours at a time so I have to think about how I’m going to best hydrate and fuel my body.

HOW DO YOU MANAGE YOUR HYDRATION AND NUTRITION DURING TRAINING?

If I’m heading out for a session that will be over 2 hours I’ll wear my hydration vest and also pack nutrition bars, peanut butter sandwiches, bananas etc. I always use PREPD, electrolyte powders on longer sessions and then PREPD recovery powder when I get home.

IN THE WORLD OF ULTRA MARATHON RACING AND TRIATHLONS, WHAT IS ON YOUR BUCKET LIST?

I would love to get to the Ironman World Championships in Kona, Hawaii one day.

I would also like to finish the Ultra Five in South Australia. This is five ultra trail marathons over the year. Not many people are able to finish the whole series as it’s incredibly taxing on the body. I had signed up for the series this year, but Covid had other plans. Maybe 2021?

Prepd- Two men thumbs up image

Interview with V8 Supercar Driver – Todd Hazelwood

WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES FOR SOMEONE CHASING A CAREER IN RACING AND HOW DID IT COME ABOUT FOR YOU?

The biggest challenge in Motor Sport is getting the right people around you. You are forever relying on other people to achieve the dream for one person. The next step out of go-karts meant that my family had to do a lot of fundraising and sponsorship to get me to the next level. Everything we did was from scratch, so it was a lot of hard work from many people around me.

WHAT ARE THE KEY ATTRIBUTES TO MAKE IT IN YOUR SPORT?

These days you have to be the complete package. Race smart and hard on the track while also being a charismatic figure and brand ambassador off the track. There are only 24 drivers in a V8 race, so that’s 24 drivers vying for a spot in any race. So you have to be damn good on and off the track to get a place and make it in Motorsport. As a kid I followed the sports superstars and you really admire the ones who are skilled as well as smart on and off the track.

WHO IS YOUR ALL-TIME FAVOURITE RACE CAR DRIVER AND WHY?

I don’t have one all time favourite but rather a top three. One is my childhood hero who was Dick Johnson. I grew up idolising him as my family did! My second is Craig Lowndes – the smiling assassin. Craig is someone to be admired as he does so much for Motorsport on and off the track. And of course Marcos Ambrose, who I grew up watching him race. Marcos bought a different element to racing, as his ability to be aggressive on the track, showed his level of determination to be the best.

DO YOU HAVE A MENTOR TO LEAN ON FOR SUPPORT AND ADVICE?

No, I never had a mentor or a coach. I do reach out to different people for advice on things like sponsorship, but I never have had a mentor in Motorsport. An overall mentor in my life would have to be my dad. He has always guided me and advised me on everything. He always has said to me “there’s a line in the sand, don’t ever cross the line, son and you will be fine”.

WHAT MAKES AN IDEAL CO-DRIVER?

Someone who is reliable and someone who always brings back the car in one piece!

WHERE WOULD WE FIND YOU IF YOU AREN’T RACING OR TRAINING?

In the shed. I always have a project car on the go and it’s the first thing I go to. I find it relaxing for the head.

WHAT “PROJECT CAR” ARE YOU WORKING ON AT THE MOMENT?

Well it’s more like a long term project car that I’m working on. When I was 12 years old, the family were selling land and items from the shed, off the family farm. I asked for the 1955 Ford MK1 Zephyr that had been left in the shed for many, many years. It was my grandpa’s, so it’s an extra special project for me.

WHICH OTHER SPORTS/TEAMS/ATHLETES DO YOU FOLLOW?

Cricket. I played cricket at school until I was 14-15 years old and I was always really keen on continuing to play, that was until I got into go-karting. I am a fan of Ricky Ponting and Steve Smith.

WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FITNESS AND HOW IMPORTANT IS CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS FOR A DRIVER?

Cardiovascular is a huge element of our sport but it’s not really talked about. Racing is like running a marathon, as you lose 2.5-3 litres of fluid every race. Endurance training is key, as you have to manage a high heart rate over a long period of time.

I do a few things to train for this; I do crossfit sessions, sprinting, cycling and I am about to get into mountain biking, as I now live in Melbourne and they have a few good tracks just outside of the city.

HOW MUCH OF AN ISSUE IS DEHYDRATION IN YOUR SPORT AND WHAT ARE THE IMPACTS? HOW DO YOU MANAGE YOUR HYDRATION & DIET?

Dehydration is the toughest to manage. The effects of dehydration are physical and cognitive fatigue and you really notice this with mistakes and reaction time. We have a strict hydration plan in place two weeks out prior to a race. You also have 2-3 days of practice prior to a race, so dehydration, if not managed, can hit you really hard on the day. So that’s why we work with a two week plan, but it gets stricter as you get closer to race day.

For my hydration and diet I focus on managing my sugar levels and diet to give me energy, so I can go the distance. I also manage my fluid loss with PREPD. I take a Prime 6-12 hours before my training or race and a Recover straight after. It is important for me to continue the hydration strategy two weeks out, so I can maintain consistency overall in all conditions. The biggest mistake is to maintain a routine/plan for a day or two.

HOW FAR FROM THE LIMIT DO YOU KEEP IT IN AN ENDURANCE RACE? HOW DO YOU BALANCE SPEED AND DURABILITY?

For an endurance race, you really have to pick your battles. Everyone at the start of a race is very tense and nervous and this is where mistakes happen. Once the race is going and there is a rhythm, then you can look at things like – is your car doing the work for you or do you need to push it further. You need to look at the bigger picture and don’t fight battles that will get you nowhere.

YOU HAVE BEEN COMPETING IN THE E-SERIES. IS THERE A PLACE FOR SIMULATED RACING IN THE FUTURE, AS WELL AS LIVE RACING?

Yes. The world of motor racing has adapted. Why not continue with E-Series moving forward? It’s a bit of fun and E-Sport is growing at a rate that is very strong. But I don’t want it to take over the real thing! There is nothing like live motor racing.

HOW CLOSE IS E-SERIES RACING TO THE REAL THING? ARE THERE ANY REAL BENEFITS THAT YOU CAN APPLY TO THE TRACK?

E-racing has the same element and has a similar technique. But the competition is different in real life. Just being in a car going at the speeds of live racing requires a certain level of skill, that you don’t need in E-racing.

IN THE WORLD OF CAR RACING, WHAT IS ON YOUR BUCKET LIST?

The Dakar Rally would be my dream race, as it includes motorbikes, buggies and trucks. Drivers are not only racing against one another, but also against some of the most extreme desert terrain in the world.

JAMIE WHINCUP AND WILL DAVISON ARE NOW REGULARS AT THE NOOSA TRIATHLON. ARE YOU IN FOR THE NEXT ONE? – IT’S OUR SHOUT.

Wow, I would never say no, but I would need to do some serious training to get across the finish line!

YOU BECAME A PREPD AMBASSADOR VERY EARLY ON IN OUR JOURNEY, WHY PREPD?

In 2014-15 PREPD was looking for sports people in South Australia to test the product in their given sports field. I also had a friend from motor sport recommend the product to me for hydration, so I was very fortunate to be in the right place at the right time. So PREPD pitched the products to me and I was very keen on trialling the product in my training and racing plan. I used it and immediately saw the benefits from it. So it’s now become my secret weapon.

Interview with AFL Sport Dietitian – Samantha Coppinger

SAMANTHA COPPINGER – WESTERN BULLDOGS FOOTBALL CLUB SPORTS DIETITIAN

We’ve been communicating with Sam for the past few seasons based on her role as a sports dietitian, working with AFL footballers at Collingwood FC and now Western Bulldogs FC. We are very grateful to Sam for sharing her experience and professional insights as a Sports Dietitian with AFL Club Western Bulldogs.

CAN YOU OFFER US A QUICK SNAPSHOT OF YOUR EXPERIENCE AND WHAT LED YOU TO WORK IN THE AFL?

I have loved AFL since I can remember. I grew up going to every Essendon game with my family and watching any game of AFL on TV that I could, I just loved the game. When I was 16, I completed work experience at Essendon Football Club with their Sports Dietitian for school. It was this experience that made me realise I wanted to be a Sports Dietitian at an AFL club.

My experience includes working with numerous sports including State Netball teams, Melbourne Victory NPL teams, elite basketball and many individual sports including athletics and iron man athletes.

My experience in football began at Williamstown Football Club in the VFL when I graduated from University. I worked for Williamstown for 5 years where I developed my skills and learnt the workings of an elite football club. For the 2019 AFL season I worked at Collingwood FC in a maternity position as their sports dietitian, and the end of the 2019 season I was lucky enough to gain employment at the Western Bulldogs FC which I am absolutely loving.

WITH AFL FOOTBALLERS AND ATHLETES IN GENERAL – CAN YOU GIVE US AN OVERVIEW OF THE KEY ASPECTS YOU DEAL WITH AS A SPORTS DIETITIAN ON A DAILY BASIS?

On a daily basis the key aspects I deal with include player education. Educating players on all aspects of nutrition is extremely important. Even though some may have been an elite athlete for a long period of time, there is always areas for improvement. Menu planning and catering is another large part of my job. Planning menus for training, snacks for training and travel and home and away games to ensure players get the appropriate nutrition. Other daily tasks include individual nutrition plans for players, overseeing the supplement program, body composition testing and management and snack and meal preparation.

WHAT ARE THE MAIN CHALLENGES THE ATHLETES YOU WORK WITH FACE – E.G. PLAYER DIETS, KNOWLEDGE AROUND NUTRITION AND HYDRATION OR COMPLIANCE?

The main challenges the athletes I work with face include knowledge around nutrition and hydration and putting it into practice. Education is so important when it comes to athlete nutrition. Constantly updating their knowledge on different aspects of nutrition so they can make any necessary changes to their diet with my guidance. The nutrition space is constantly changing and adapting so I need to help my athletes follow accordingly. Providing athletes with as much support as possible including cooking classes, recipes, supermarket tours, meal ideas and many interactive education sessions is the best way to overcome these challenges.

Supplements are definitely a challenge for athletes. The biggest challenge is new food products coming onto the market that contain supplements such as protein powders. Educating athletes in regards to reading food labels and understanding what they can and can’t have is really important.

NUTRITION AND HYDRATION ARE REALLY IMPORTANT PILLARS RELATING TO AFL FOOTBALLERS PERFORMANCE, WHAT IMPROVEMENTS DO YOU SEE WHEN ATHLETES MAKE POSITIVE CHANGES IN THESE AREAS?

We see numerous improvements when athletes make positive changes through nutrition and hydration. Increased energy is a major improvement we see that benefits an athletes performance. Improved recovery and immunity is also seen when athletes make improvements to their nutrition and hydration. We see positive changes to body composition which includes decreased body fat and/or increased or maintenance of muscle mass. Changes also allow athletes to get through games without cramping or discomfort.

WORKING THROUGH THE FOLLOWING PHASES OF AN AFL SEASON, CAN YOU EXPLAIN HOW YOU MANAGE PLAYERS NUTRITION & HYDRATION PROTOCOLS:

Pre-season training:

– Heavy training loads
– Combating fatigue 
– Backing up training

During pre-season our players have their highest workload. During this phase of the season they have the highest energy requirements with carbohydrates being of high priority. Our main focus during pre-season is fuelling for training, recovering optimally to allow players to back up training sessions and following hydration protocols. As our pre-season is completed during summer, hydration plays a major role. The warmer conditions often mean increased sweat rates which equals greater fluid and electrolyte losses. This was when I saw the benefit of trialling PREPD with my athletes. During pre-season I focus on helping individual players with their nutrition and hydration practices to set them up for the season ahead and help them achieve their goals.

In season training:
– Week leading into a game – Daily guideline for nutrition & hydration

The week leading into a game I recommend players eat to their training load. On a higher training day they require additional carbohydrates compared to a light training session or a rest day where they require a smaller amount. As a general rule, on a rest day I recommend players following a plate model of ¼ carbohydrates, ¼ protein and ½ plate vegetables. On a higher training day players would increase their carbohydrate portion to ½ a plate and reduce their vegetable portion to ¼ plate.

– Pre-Game – Importance of preparation 24hrs before & do you take any measurements, weight, urine sample, etc.

Player preparation is extremely important prior to a game. The timing of their meals prior to a game is important to prevent any gastrointestinal discomfort and to ensure optimal energy levels for the game. I give players general recommendations relating to when they should consume their pre-game meals and snacks, but their timing is very individual. I work closely with each player to determine what works well for them and make any necessary changes. The day prior to a game we take a urine sample. The urine sample allows us to test their hydration levels and gives the players enough time to make any necessary changes before the game if they are dehydrated. Prior to warm up all players are required to record their weight. After the game all players will do the same. This allows us to see how much weight a player has lost during a game. This is all hydration losses the player has experienced. Every 1kg of body weight lost, is 1.5L of fluid the player needs to replace. Taking the players weight allows us to know how much fluid each individual player needs to replace for optimal recovery.

– In-Game – Fuel / energy supplements + hydration strategies.

In-game the players use a range of hydration drinks including water, cordial, Powerade and Koda / Shotz. Every player has different preferences for what they like to drink during a game, with some players preferring different drinks depending on the time of the game. Pickle juice is used during games to help prevent/stop cramping. Players swig the pickle juice in the throat and a message is sent to their muscle to stop cramping. Energy gels are used in all games by some players to provide additional energy. Gels provide a liquid form of glucose to help top up energy levels during a game.

– Post-Game – Recovery aspects / measurements.

Post-Game the nutrition focus is on the three R’s. Refuel, repair and rehydrate. Refuel with carbohydrates to replace depleted energy stores, protein to repair damaged muscles and fluid and electrolytes to replace fluid losses. Our aim is for the players to have a snack within 30-60 minutes of finishing the game. We also recommend players have a meal within 2 hours of completing the game to help follow the three R principle.

YOU HAVE RECOMMENDED PREPD TO SOME OF THE PLAYING GROUP – CAN YOU EXPLAIN HOW THIS CAME ABOUT AND THE BENEFITS / IMPROVEMENTS YOU WERE ABLE TO VALIDATE, E.G. CRAMPING AND FLUID LOSS.

I had a few players who were struggling with hydration. They would do all of the right things but still lost large amounts of fluid during a game and had issues with cramping. I wanted to look outside the box and see what else I could do to help these athletes. I came across PREPD in some studies and decided to give it a try. The biggest benefit my athletes found with PREPD was the reduction in fluid losses during a game.

YOU HAVE RECENTLY TRIALLED THE PREPD POWDER HOW DID THE PLAYERS RESPOND – WHAT WAS THE FEEDBACK ON THE POWDER?

The players responded really well to the PREPD powder. I trialled it with a select group of players who had tried PREPD previously but didn’t like the texture or consistency. These players responded much better to the PREPD powder. They mixed the powder into a smoothie which they found much easier to drink. We saw the same results as PREPD but offering another option proved beneficial.

THE PREPD RECOVER POWDER FORMULA HAS AN OPTIMUM SERVE OF ELECTROLYTES, RESISTANT STARCH TO BOOST HYDRATION AND FLUID ABSORPTION, PLUS ADDED PROTEIN AND LEUCINE FOR MUSCLE RECOVERY – WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF USING THIS POST EXERCISE?

The benefits of consuming the PREPD Recover powder is that it contains the added protein. The added protein and leucine make it a great recovery drink as this will help with muscle repair and recovery post exercise as well as hydration. It is beneficial to have it all combined into one product as athletes don’t have to drink many different products to get the same benefit.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TRAPS AND PITFALLS ATHLETES NEED TO WATCH OUT FOR DURING THIS PERIOD OF ISOLATION AWAY FROM THE CLUB AND CHANGED TRAINING CIRCUMSTANCES?

One of the biggest areas is a change in their training regime. Majority of athletes are still training at home and have programs to complete but their overall energy output will be decreased. Therefore, they need to decrease the amount they are consuming. Changing their intake on a day to day basis to match their training is even more critical during the isolation period to ensure athletes aren’t over-eating and seeing large changes in body composition.

Maintaining muscle mass is also essential during this time. Ensuring an even spread of protein across the day and timing their protein intake around their training to help maintain muscle mass. Athletes are the same as everyone else. Avoiding boredom eating during isolation is one of the biggest challenges. Everyone is home a lot more and has direct access to the fridge and pantry 24/7. Avoiding sugary, highly processed snacks and having nutritious alternatives available is essential during this time.

LOOKING FORWARD WITH SOME POSITIVITY, AN AFL SEASON MAY START LATER THIS YEAR. WHAT CHALLENGES DO YOU EXPECT THE PLAYERS TO FACE RETURNING FROM AN EXTENDED BREAK?

I believe one of the biggest challenges the AFL players are facing is isolation. I don’t think it will take them long to get back into their usual routines once we begin training again. We know that once we start training again, we won’t have long before the season will resume. This means players need to be staying on top of their nutrition and training now, or it will be very hard to get back to where they were once we return.

INTERVIEW with Head Coach of Sunshine Coast Triathlon Academy – TOBY COOTE

With the global triathlon calendar turned on its head, we speak to Toby Coote, the founder and Head Coach of the Sunshine Coast Triathlon Academy, about disruption and adaptation amidst the turmoil of COVID-19.

Toby is a former Professional Triathlete and Australian Junior Triathlon Representative. Having founded The Sunshine Coast Triathlon academy back 2002, Toby has 29 years of experience in Triathlon with the last 18 years as a Coach.  He has been awarded Triathlon Queensland Junior Coach of the Year on two occasions as well as Sunshine Coast Sports Federation Coach of the Year.

Toby works with beginners, Juniors, Age Groupers and Elite athletes helping them towards their respective goals and you will also hear his voice at various races throughout the Oceania Region where he works as a race commentator for Queensland Events and Ironman.

MANY BUSINESSES ARE FACING A CHALLENGING TIME GIVEN THE CURRENT ENVIRONMENT AND COACHING IS NO DIFFERENT. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES YOU ARE EXPERIENCING AND IN WHAT WAYS HAVE YOU HAD TO ADAPT?

The hardest thing has been the change in my normal day to day routine. I’m a hands-on coach and I was running up to 16 sessions a week, so the gradual restrictions have been challenging. The initial limitation of 10 people per session wasn’t too bad as I could still maintain a good level of coaching. Next the pools closed, and we started using the beach for swim sessions. And now, under the current restrictions, I can really only do 1:1 sessions which is a big change and far from ideal. Having said that, monthly individual training plans are continuing as usual and I am able to review results and make any necessary adjustments.

Being near the end of the tri season, some of my athletes were already taking scheduled breaks and others have now brought forward their breaks a little earlier than they normally would have so I have already started my post season reviews with these athletes.

Pricing also becomes an important factor. I need to maintain a business but I’m mindful of not overpricing my services whilst still delivering on quality and value.

WITH THE CANCELLATION AND POSTPONEMENT OF SO MANY EVENTS IT MUST BE DIFFICULT TO DESIGN TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR YOUR MEMBERS. HOW DO YOU GO ABOUT RESETTING GOALS AND TRAINING LOADS, AND WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF TIME AWAY FROM RACING?

It’s difficult. At present various dates are being thrown around for recommencement of racing, but these are only proposed dates and so don’t have fixed targets to aim at – we are in limbo really.

Generally, the goals have changed from a race focus to a weekly platform of skills and personal development. We have an opportunity now to assess and work on any weaknesses away from the pressures of racing, and it also gives us time to really work on our bodies and our core in particular. We now have valuable time to rebuild so that we are stronger and revitalised when we do eventually return to full-time training and racing.

It’s during the off season that I generally expect to see two different types of athletes emerge – those that set themselves up to succeed, and those that set themselves up to fail. It’s only when we get back to racing that they will realise that the paths that they choose today will determine their results, not just for the next season, but every season beyond.

Motivation will play a key part as we move into winter, but a good state of mental health is equally as important. There’ll be a lot of soul searching and some dark days ahead, so checking in to see how athletes are going during these times becomes an essential part of my role.

We also want healthy athletes with strong immune systems, so the intensity is reduced from that of the normal load that I would put on the athletes. As long as you communicate the process to the athletes and where we are at present, a day to day to week process is very important.

THE SOCIAL ASPECTS OF BEING INVOLVED IN A TRIATHLON CLUB ARE EXTREMELY IMPORTANT IN TERMS OF MOTIVATION AND SUPPORT. HOW ARE YOU MANAGING TO KEEP EVERYONE CONNECTED, ENERGISED, AND ON TASK TO ACHIEVE THEIR TRAINING GOALS?

The social interaction that we see in our daily SCTA Session is a major factor why athletes train in groups. I am fortunate to still be doing some 1:1 session with them so am able to keep that interaction going and talking thru the processes and seeing how they are travelling during this period. It is really tough on the athlete, but also on the coach/es. Its breaking down the process and informing the athlete of that process and why we are doing it and how it will benefit them in the coming months when we are back to normality

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TRAPS AND PITFALLS ATHLETES NEED TO WATCH OUT FOR NOW THAT SOCIAL DISTANCING RESTRICTIONS HAVE LIMITED TRAINING TO INDOORS AND SOLO OUTDOORS?

Riding alone on the roads compared to the safety of small group rides is a concern. Training alone also leads to some athletes pushing themselves harder than they need to at this point in time, and although some will embrace it, it can also be mentally tougher for some.

AN ATHLETE’S MENTAL STRENGTH AND RESILIENCE IS AN IMPORTANT FACTOR NOW IN PARTICULAR – DO YOU HAVE ANY GUIDANCE OR ADVICE THAT YOU RECOMMEND TO YOUR ATHLETES?

Understand the process at this point in time and understand why you are doing it. There is always a reasoning behind what we do so understanding this and also how important it is in setting up the next season will vital to get through this period.

HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR ATHLETES TO EAT WELL, HYDRATE WELL AND HAVE GOOD GUT HEALTH AND IMMUNITY?

It’s always important. As I have mentioned, we want healthy athletes with strong immune systems, especially at this time with the COVID 19 situation. My team know that having good gut health is integral to maintaining a strong immune system, and I see the prebiotic actions of the PREPD products as providing a big benefit to the heath and general well-being of my athletes.

We’ve mainly focused on the hydration benefits to date, so it has been a great opportunity to investigate the broader health aspects.

Training & nutrition during COVID-19 with Abbey Lewis

EXERCISE AND MENTAL HEALTH

We all understand that exercise supports our physical & mental health and being active can not only keep us healthy, it can also help us fight off infection. Exercise boosts our mental health, and during this challenging time of uncertainly it’s more important than ever to keep our minds clear and focused.

 

 

With all immediate races being cancelled you might be lacking motivation but there is no better time to put in the work, as it will provide a springboard to an even better training/racing cycle later in the year. Training for triathlons during this time is challenging and you will need to think outside the box, step outside that box, do things you wouldn’t normally do, and keep pushing forward!

 

As well as maintaining our training plans, it’s also just as imperative to pay attention to our diet and nutritional status during the COVID-19 pandemic.  By utilising PREPD you will be enhancing your normal hydration strategy which is especially helpful if you are maintaining your training intensity or amplifying it!

Plus, the prebiotic nature of the resistant starch in PREPD supports good gut health and your immune system.

HERE’S SOME TIPS ON HOW TO INCLUDE PREPD INTO YOUR TRAINING REGIME

BREAKFAST Blueberry & Vanilla Oats

  • Oats
  • Flaxseeds
  • Chia Seeds
  • Banana
  • Blueberries
  • 3.25 LEVEL SCOOPS of PRIME Vanilla Powder
  • Almond Milk

*MIX TOGETHER and cook on the stove top or if you’re in a hurry zap it in the microwave for 3mins

 

Post Training Shake

  • Ice
  • 2.5 LEVEL SCOOPS of RECOVER Chocolate Powder
  • Water

*BLEND TOGETHER and drink

 

Dessert (or a sweet treat)

  • Chobani
  • 2.5 LEVEL SCOOPS of RECOVER Chocolate Powder
  • Xo crunch

*MIX TOGETHER

 

ON THE GO

I always keep a few bottles of PREPD PRIME & PREPD RECOVER in the fridge for when I am in rush between training sessions.  My top tip is that the bottles are the perfect fit for your back pocket when out on the bike- my favourite flavour is strawberry & kiwi!

Ironman – Steve McKenna’s favourite indoor training session

WHAT IS YOUR ROUTINE BEFORE TRAINING, HOW DOES IT HELP PREPARE YOU FOR LONGER TRAINING SESSIONS?

With no racing coming up, now is a great time to get some long, unstructured aerobic training days in. Riding, swimming and running are my obvious choices!

 

Prime Smoothie @ 8.30pm
More often than not, I will train in the morning, so the night prior I will make myself a PREPD Prime Smoothie, in preparation for the long day ahead.
  • 3.25 x scoops of PREPD Prime powder (Vanilla)
  • 1 x banana
  • Soy milk/water

 

Recover Smoothie @ 8.00am (or straight after training)
After every training session I will make myself another PREPD Recover Smoothie, to help my muscles recover from the session and enables me to get on with my work day.
  • 2.5 x scoops of PREPD Recover protein powder (Chocolate)
  • 1 x handful of mixed frozen berries
  • Soy milk/water

This combination of using both the PREPD Prime and Recover powders gives me that extra protein, electrolytes and hydration, to aid my body in recovery, so I can back up the sessions daily. I also know that the probiotic nature of the resistant starch in PREPD supports my gut health and immune system.

WHAT INDOOR SESSION DO YOU RECOMMEND NOW, WITH SOCIAL ISOLATION?

This is one of the sessions Reedy (Ironman Tim Reed – also Steve McKenna’s coach) has set for me in the past and I love it. Even though I didn’t create it… it’s still my all time personal favourite session.

75min indoor cycling session – bang for buck!!
  • 15-20min warm up building from zone 1 heart rate to zone 2 heart rate.
  • 4 x 8min (as 4min grinding 50-60 cadence @ 4.2watts/kg, 4min just above 70.3 race power @ 4.8watts/kg).
  • 2 x min rest in between each 8 min effort.
  • 15min cool down.
Takeout:
  • For me at 66kg this equates to 280watts for the first 4mins and 320watts for the second 4min.
  • Bang for buck – getting both strength work in, along with some upper aerobic work.
  • Getting used to pushing just above race power on tired legs (straight after a leg burning strength effort).
This will be extremely useful in many race situations, particularly when someone is trying to break away and your legs are shagged….. thinking back to these sessions, its comforting at the time knowing that you can still push good power on tired legs.

A NOTE FOR INDOOR TRAINING HYDRATION > FROM PREPD

“With the increase of indoor training volume, my riders are more susceptible to dehydration. It is very easy to lose 2-3 kg in a 1 hour indoor workout. With this in mind, I have the riders weigh themselves before and after a workout about once a week. This way they can get a gauge of how much they sweat they are losing from a particular ride. This is where PREPD is going to provide them with a definite advantage to their performance by enhancing their normal hydration strategy.” – Kevin Poulton (renowned UCI Cycling Coach). To read more – click here.