Prepd- Two men hiking

COLD WEATHER HYDRATION – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

YOU CAN STILL DEHYDRATE IN WINTER

While the importance of hydration is on our minds during the warmer weather, it is often forgotten during the colder months, and the colder months are here!

Proper hydration during winter is necessary to keep our muscles healthy and our bodies performing at their optimal level. As we don’t feel as thirsty during the colder weather, we often fail to meet our body’s fluid requirements. About 60% of our body is made up of water. Water is essential to the proper function of our muscles, our brain as well as hundreds of other physiological reactions in our body’s. Fluid loss, even as little as 2% of our total body weight, begins to negatively impact our mental and physical performance.

THERE ARE A FEW REASONS WHY DEHYDRATION CAN SNEAK UP ON US DURING COLDER WEATHER COMPARED TO WARMER WEATHER:

LOWER TEMPERATURES SUPPRESS THIRST

Cold weather does not trigger the thirst response like warm weather does. Blood flow to the extremities is constricted during cold weather. The blood instead is directed towards the internal organs in an attempt to maintain core body temperature. As long as the body’s core has sufficient blood flow, the brain does not detect dehydration, and the thirst response is not activated. This is good for survival, but bad for performance hydration! The take home point here is, don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink!

 

COLD AIR SUCKS MOISTURE FROM THE BODY

Cold air holds less moisture than warm air. With each breath we take our lungs need to moisturise that air before it is exhaled and replaced again with cold dry air. When this process is repeated over a sustained period of time, it increases the risks of dehydration.

 

SWEAT EVAPOURATES QUICKER IN COLD WEATHER

Although you might not feel like you are sweating that much, the perspiration that does reach your skin is quickly evaporated and you might not even feel that sweaty at the end of your exercise. You may think, I didn’t sweat that much, so I don’t need to drink that much. Not true! Try weighing yourself before and after your run. You should drink about 500ml of fluid for every half kilo that you sweat out.

 

INADEQUATE CLOTHING

In cold weather, good technical layering is essential in preventing dehydration and overheating. Significant metabolic heat can be generated as a result of heavy or moisture trapping fabrics, which can result in elevated sweat rates.

 

A good base-layer should wick the moisture away from your body to keep you dry and allow for evaporative cooling to occur. Without the proper clothing, an average sized person performing moderate to heavy exercise, can lose up to an extra 2.0 litres of sweat per hour!

 

URINE PRODUCTION IS INCREASED DURING COLDER WEATHER

Blood flow is constricted when it’s cold. This constriction causes an increase in blood pressure. The body tries to counteract the higher blood pressure by getting rid of some of the volume of water in the blood. It does this by increasing urine output which contributes to dehydration.

FOLLOW THESE TIPS TO AVOID DEHYDRATION DURING COLD CLIMATE EXERCISE:

  • Drink before, during and after exercise.
  • Think to drink! Don’t rely on thirst alone.
  • Use an electrolyte drink for longer endurance type exercise.
  • Choose the right clothing. Try using a mask or a scarf that covers your face to help warm the air before it enters your lungs.
  • Try to avoid fluids that can dehydrate the body. These include; alcohol, some carbonated drinks and caffeinated drinks.
  • Monitor the colour and the volume of urine your body is producing. Your urine should be light yellow or clear. If it is darker, drink more water and/or electrolyte.
  • Look out for early signs of dehydration including fatigue, light-headedness and even irritability.

HOW DOES PREPD HELP?

Well that’s really simple – by improving the absorption of your water/sports drink by up to 30+% and by decreasing fluid loss during exercise by up to 85%. Don’t just take our word for it, check out our published and peer reviewed clinical trial.

 

Whether it’s hot or cold, use the PREPD Hydration System to:

Improve Hydration – Reduce Fatigue – Improve Performance – and Recover Quickly – Ready to Go Again!

Prepd- Two men thumbs up image

Interview with V8 Supercar Driver – Todd Hazelwood

WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES FOR SOMEONE CHASING A CAREER IN RACING AND HOW DID IT COME ABOUT FOR YOU?

The biggest challenge in Motor Sport is getting the right people around you. You are forever relying on other people to achieve the dream for one person. The next step out of go-karts meant that my family had to do a lot of fundraising and sponsorship to get me to the next level. Everything we did was from scratch, so it was a lot of hard work from many people around me.

WHAT ARE THE KEY ATTRIBUTES TO MAKE IT IN YOUR SPORT?

These days you have to be the complete package. Race smart and hard on the track while also being a charismatic figure and brand ambassador off the track. There are only 24 drivers in a V8 race, so that’s 24 drivers vying for a spot in any race. So you have to be damn good on and off the track to get a place and make it in Motorsport. As a kid I followed the sports superstars and you really admire the ones who are skilled as well as smart on and off the track.

WHO IS YOUR ALL-TIME FAVOURITE RACE CAR DRIVER AND WHY?

I don’t have one all time favourite but rather a top three. One is my childhood hero who was Dick Johnson. I grew up idolising him as my family did! My second is Craig Lowndes – the smiling assassin. Craig is someone to be admired as he does so much for Motorsport on and off the track. And of course Marcos Ambrose, who I grew up watching him race. Marcos bought a different element to racing, as his ability to be aggressive on the track, showed his level of determination to be the best.

DO YOU HAVE A MENTOR TO LEAN ON FOR SUPPORT AND ADVICE?

No, I never had a mentor or a coach. I do reach out to different people for advice on things like sponsorship, but I never have had a mentor in Motorsport. An overall mentor in my life would have to be my dad. He has always guided me and advised me on everything. He always has said to me “there’s a line in the sand, don’t ever cross the line, son and you will be fine”.

WHAT MAKES AN IDEAL CO-DRIVER?

Someone who is reliable and someone who always brings back the car in one piece!

WHERE WOULD WE FIND YOU IF YOU AREN’T RACING OR TRAINING?

In the shed. I always have a project car on the go and it’s the first thing I go to. I find it relaxing for the head.

WHAT “PROJECT CAR” ARE YOU WORKING ON AT THE MOMENT?

Well it’s more like a long term project car that I’m working on. When I was 12 years old, the family were selling land and items from the shed, off the family farm. I asked for the 1955 Ford MK1 Zephyr that had been left in the shed for many, many years. It was my grandpa’s, so it’s an extra special project for me.

WHICH OTHER SPORTS/TEAMS/ATHLETES DO YOU FOLLOW?

Cricket. I played cricket at school until I was 14-15 years old and I was always really keen on continuing to play, that was until I got into go-karting. I am a fan of Ricky Ponting and Steve Smith.

WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FITNESS AND HOW IMPORTANT IS CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS FOR A DRIVER?

Cardiovascular is a huge element of our sport but it’s not really talked about. Racing is like running a marathon, as you lose 2.5-3 litres of fluid every race. Endurance training is key, as you have to manage a high heart rate over a long period of time.

I do a few things to train for this; I do crossfit sessions, sprinting, cycling and I am about to get into mountain biking, as I now live in Melbourne and they have a few good tracks just outside of the city.

HOW MUCH OF AN ISSUE IS DEHYDRATION IN YOUR SPORT AND WHAT ARE THE IMPACTS? HOW DO YOU MANAGE YOUR HYDRATION & DIET?

Dehydration is the toughest to manage. The effects of dehydration are physical and cognitive fatigue and you really notice this with mistakes and reaction time. We have a strict hydration plan in place two weeks out prior to a race. You also have 2-3 days of practice prior to a race, so dehydration, if not managed, can hit you really hard on the day. So that’s why we work with a two week plan, but it gets stricter as you get closer to race day.

For my hydration and diet I focus on managing my sugar levels and diet to give me energy, so I can go the distance. I also manage my fluid loss with PREPD. I take a Prime 6-12 hours before my training or race and a Recover straight after. It is important for me to continue the hydration strategy two weeks out, so I can maintain consistency overall in all conditions. The biggest mistake is to maintain a routine/plan for a day or two.

HOW FAR FROM THE LIMIT DO YOU KEEP IT IN AN ENDURANCE RACE? HOW DO YOU BALANCE SPEED AND DURABILITY?

For an endurance race, you really have to pick your battles. Everyone at the start of a race is very tense and nervous and this is where mistakes happen. Once the race is going and there is a rhythm, then you can look at things like – is your car doing the work for you or do you need to push it further. You need to look at the bigger picture and don’t fight battles that will get you nowhere.

YOU HAVE BEEN COMPETING IN THE E-SERIES. IS THERE A PLACE FOR SIMULATED RACING IN THE FUTURE, AS WELL AS LIVE RACING?

Yes. The world of motor racing has adapted. Why not continue with E-Series moving forward? It’s a bit of fun and E-Sport is growing at a rate that is very strong. But I don’t want it to take over the real thing! There is nothing like live motor racing.

HOW CLOSE IS E-SERIES RACING TO THE REAL THING? ARE THERE ANY REAL BENEFITS THAT YOU CAN APPLY TO THE TRACK?

E-racing has the same element and has a similar technique. But the competition is different in real life. Just being in a car going at the speeds of live racing requires a certain level of skill, that you don’t need in E-racing.

IN THE WORLD OF CAR RACING, WHAT IS ON YOUR BUCKET LIST?

The Dakar Rally would be my dream race, as it includes motorbikes, buggies and trucks. Drivers are not only racing against one another, but also against some of the most extreme desert terrain in the world.

JAMIE WHINCUP AND WILL DAVISON ARE NOW REGULARS AT THE NOOSA TRIATHLON. ARE YOU IN FOR THE NEXT ONE? – IT’S OUR SHOUT.

Wow, I would never say no, but I would need to do some serious training to get across the finish line!

YOU BECAME A PREPD AMBASSADOR VERY EARLY ON IN OUR JOURNEY, WHY PREPD?

In 2014-15 PREPD was looking for sports people in South Australia to test the product in their given sports field. I also had a friend from motor sport recommend the product to me for hydration, so I was very fortunate to be in the right place at the right time. So PREPD pitched the products to me and I was very keen on trialling the product in my training and racing plan. I used it and immediately saw the benefits from it. So it’s now become my secret weapon.

PREPD TEST LAB – Bicycling Australia, Article Karen Forman

BIKE RIDERS LOVE ‘NEW’

– new bikes, new kit and new products. But sometimes we find a product that we like, that works for us, and we don’t really want to change things up, especially when it comes to personal aspects such as hydration.

Asked to review another new hydration product not so long after I spent a month drinking a brand that I liked enough to take it to France on a recent trip for Bicycling Australia, I wondered… really? Can there be anything better than this? What could be different about PREPD?

Then I spent some time chatting with Nathan Hocking and his team and learnt a thing or two about this new product. Namely, it isn’t a hydration drink, but actually a hydration enhancer. So that idea is very new. It meant I didn’t have to quit drinking the product I had decided was ‘my’ hydration drink. I could still have it, but add PREPD to my before and after exercise regime.

The theory was that PREPD, which tastes like a very nice fruit smoothie (the mango and passionfruit Prime is taken six to 12 hours before training or racing while the equally as flavoursome strawberry and kiwi Recover is taken straight afterwards) works with other forms of hydration in my body (including water), enhancing their absorption. And as most riders know, with better hydration, an athlete can minimise dehydration, sustain training/racing efforts, recover better and reduce the risk of heat stroke on super-hot summer days. With that information, I was keen to try some for myself and even hauled the road bike out of storage after a snowy winter to get out there, sweat a bit in the spring sunshine, and see if it worked.

A MAJOR ADVANCEMENT
Until recently, we have not seen any substantial advances in hydration technology since sports drinks were invented. PREPD professes to change this by significantly increasing the absorption of all fluids consumed by athletes.

Backed by 20-plus years of research and testing through Flinders and Yale Universities, PREPD, as mentioned above consumed pre- and postexercise, has been proven to boost the absorption of leading sports drinks and water. Interestingly, the Prime is taken a minimum of six hours before you clip in and with its smoothie-like texture, minimal sugar and a pleasant flavour, isn’t bad as a night cap the night before a morning ride.

So how does it work? Why is it so different? The team at PREPD explained they use patent-pending resistant starch formulations; this specific resistance starch has been proven through research to enhance fluid and electrolyte absorption in the gut. As many of us have experienced, often most inconveniently while trying to do a PB in a race or sportif, when dehydration sets in it is extremely difficult to rehydrate fast enough to avoid performance deterioration. Nathan from PREPD said the crippling sensation of fatigue towards the end of a long training session or in competition is caused as much by dehydration as from depletion of fuel stores as is commonly to blame.

CLINICAL STUDY

A recent hydration clinical trial of elite AFL players published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition acknowledged that fluid deficits exceeding as little as 1.6% could lead to physical and cognitive impairment in athletes. It found that sport drinks used by athletes were often hyperosmolar; this was known to be suboptimal for rehydration as it did not utilise the absorptive capacity of the large intestine which could be enhanced by fermentative production of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) from substrates such as resistant starch – as utilised by PREPD. The primary outcome markers of hydration were hematocrit (the ratio of the volume of red blood cells to the total volume of blood) and body weight.

Across three time-points, hematocrit was significantly lower and body weight significantly higher in sports drinks compared to maize starch. The study’s conclusion was that the combination of the significantly lower hematocrit and increased body weight in the maize starch group represented better hydration not only at the end of training as well as following a recovery period but also at its commencement. “The magnitude of the benefit seems sufficient to have an impact on performance and further studies to test this possibility are now indicated.” There is strong research to back up PREPD’s claim of enhanced hydration along with a growing number of athletes  using PREPD and experiencing improved hydration and performance benefits.

Riding (and a bit of spring snow skiing) with PREPD for just a week, I wasn’t able to test my hematocrit and didn’t weigh myself, but I found that I didn’t feel as thirsty/obviously dehydrated as I usually do, particularly on the mountain. I am keen to try it again in the hot summer months when I spend hours coaching junior and master’s riders at mostly club level.

WORLDTOUR TESTED

Kevin Poulton is head coach UCI WorldTour Team Katusha Alpecin and has had long-term experience and is a strong advocate of using PREPD. With 20 years of coaching experience, victories in Paris-Roubaix 2016, Grand Tour stage wins, World Tour Classics and many podium places at World Tour level, Kevin understands the planning, science and training required to win the biggest cycling races. He was first introduced to PREPD at a pre-Vuelta training camp in Andorra during the height of summer last year, conducted his own research and knew what the supposed benefits were. “I wanted to trial PREPD without giving away what we were looking for from the product,” he said. “To my amazement, everything PREPD expected the athlete to experience with the product, he was conveying the same messages back to me. Most notably, he was strong in the final hour of training. I was monitoring pre- and post-exercise weight and I was very pleased with the minimal amount of fluid loss experienced despite the high temperatures. “PREPD complimented our existing hydration strategy. For the athlete, implementing the use of PREPD pre- and post-training into the daily hydration strategy was seamless. “The key difference we continue to see with pro cyclists using PREPD is less reduction in post-exercise weight through better hydration. This reduced fluid loss is resulting in a stronger performance by the athlete especially in the later stages of racing.”

Another fan of PREPD is Australian rider Gina Ricardo, who rides for the Sydney Uni- Staminade Women’s Cycling Team. “I first trialled PREPD in training in January 2017 and then continued using it throughout UCI road racing events in the heat of summer,” she says. “I have to say that I truly believe in the product – my performance felt great after drinking Prime and I didn’t experience any cramping at all throughout the January racing calendar despite some really tough and hot conditions.”” PREPD comes as a bottled drink and the recommended retail price for 350ml is $7.50. Riders can order a starter pack online, 2 x Prime & 2 x Recover for $26 including freight. It is also available through a growing number of cycle and sports retailers. BA

More details at www.prepdhydration.com.au

TIM REED’S FINAL PREPARATION FOR THE 2019 IRONMAN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

TIM REED PREPD FOR KONA – CHECK OUT HIS AMAZING VIDEO

Final preparation week for Tim Reed before the Ironman World Championship – Check out Reedy’s reconnaissance training around the spectacular Hawaii Island district of Kona. After a gruelling training camp in Boulder, Colorado, Reedy has been acclimatising to the hot and humid conditions he’ll face on race day. He’s been smashing the training, and also smashing through PREPD, so much so that we had to ship out more product to his training base.

Off the back of a successful 2019, Reedy looks primed to make a big impact at Kona. We wish him all the best in his 2019 quest for success at the IRONMAN World Championship.

The team at PREPD are stoked to announce our continuing partnership with Tim Reed in 2020.  Reedy is an outstanding athlete and great person, we love the journey he’s taken us on. Go Reedy…!

The Impact of Dehydration on Sports Performance

DEHYDRATION AND PERFORMANCE

The negative impact of dehydration on sports performance can be significant even at low levels of dehydration (1.5% bodyweight loss – Moquin et al 2000) and affects a wide range of key performance factors from power output to skill execution. While most people are broadly aware of the importance of maintaining good hydration, the far-reaching impact of dehydration on sports performance is often underestimated.

For athletes looking to improve their performance, understanding their own hydration requirements and minimising dehydration is a critical part of preparation for peak performance in training and competition. When dehydration sets in, it is extremely difficult to rehydrate fast enough to avoid performance deterioration.

HOW DEHYDRATION AFFECTS THE BODY

During moderate to intense exertion, typical athlete sweat rates range from 1-3 litres per hour. This means that for most people, when exerting for an hour or more, fluid loss is likely to be near or over 2% of body mass loss (BML) leading to physiological responses from the body to combat dehydration.

As the body sweats to cool down during sport, the resulting fluid loss decreases blood plasma (the fluid part of the blood), causing the blood to thicken. As the blood thickens, its ability to carry oxygen decreases, putting extra pressure on the heart to work harder to pump oxygen and glucose (fuel) to the muscles. This in turn has a flow-on effect of increasing the body’s core temperature which further impairs the body’s ability to maintain water balance. Performance decline is inevitable as the body needs to work harder to achieve the same output and uses fuel less efficiently, which increases the rate of fatigue (Armstrong et al. 1985; Craig and Cummings 1966; Maughan 1991; Sawka and Pandolf 1990).

DEHYDRATION DECREASES POWER OUTPUT AND ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE

Dehydration of over 2% BML has been shown to reduce lactate threshold, lower absolute power output and significantly decrease time to exhaustion (Moquin et al 2000). Additional evidence includes the following studies.

  • Cycling time trial performance was 13% slower at 2-3% BML (Sprenger et al 2015)
  • Cycling sprint to exhaustion time was 29% lower at 2.5% BML (Ebert et al 2007) and has even been reported to reduce by 30% at only 1.8% BML (Walsh et al 1994).
  • Maximal aerobic power (VO2max) was 5% lower at 3% BML (Pinchan et all 1988).
  • BML as low as 1.6% can slow running performance by 7% (Armstrong et al 1985)
  • Even when drinking to thirst, athletes can experience over 2% BML resulting in a 7% decrease in cycling power output (Adams et al 2018).

DEHYDRATION IMPAIRS DECISION MAKING AND SKILL EXECUTION

Furthermore, growing evidence indicates that dehydration over 2% BML inhibits cognitive function (Wittbrodt et al 2018) and impairs skill execution.

  • Tennis serve accuracy reduced by 30% at 1.5% BML (Davey et al 2002)
  • Progressive deterioration of basketball skill performance as dehydration increased over 2% BML (Baker et al 2007).
  • Cricket bowling accuracy reduced by 17% at under 3% BML (Devlin et al 2001).

With many other similar studies supporting these results, we can expect significant dehydration to impact skill execution in all major ball sports including Australian rules football, rugby, soccer, hockey and netball.

DEHYDRATION CAUSES FATIGUE

The crippling sensation of fatigue experienced by athletes towards the end of a long training session or in competition is caused as much by dehydration as from depletion of fuel stores. Dehydration during exercise can have a cascading effect on the body’s responses to continued exertion and energy requirements.

As dehydration increases, it becomes harder for the athlete to catch up replacing the fluid they have lost. As the blood thickens with dehydration and the muscles need to work harder to pump blood around the body, lactic acid build up becomes more concentrated and athlete energy requirements increase. Energy replacement is typically addressed with high-glucose energy foods or drinks, which can actually reduce the body’s capacity for hydration. This further exacerbates the severity of dehydration and in turn negatively impacts on muscle fatigue, cramping and declining athletic performance (Murray 2007). Read more about the pros and cons of different sports electrolyte drinks here.

BOOSTING ATHLETE PERFORMANCE WITH BETTER HYDRATION

Both professional and serious recreational athletes are driven by the need to find an extra edge over their competition. In all sports, the quality and intensity of training and preparation is fundamental to optimal performance in competition. Those looking for the competitive edge need to ensure they can minimise dehydration to perform at their peak longer and recover sooner.

Until recently, we have not seen any substantial advances in hydration technology since sports drinks were invented over fifty years agoPREPD changes this by significantly increasing the absorption of all fluids consumed by athletes, in order to reduce dehydration and maintain performance. Backed by over 20 years of research and testing, PREPD is a hydration enhancer consumed pre- and post-exercise, and is proven to boost the absorption of leading sports drinks and water (O’Connell et al 2018). Using patent-pending resistant starch formulations, PREPD is designed to enhance fluid absorption in the gut, which has an untapped potential to absorb up to 5L of fluid per day. To find out more about how PREPD works, read the science here.

PREPD helps boost Tim Reed to 2nd place in IRONMAN Australia

IRONMAN AUSTRALIA 2019 – FULL POST-RACE INTERVIEW WITH TIM REED

“Having had PREPD the night before, I was holding pace in the final 10k’s of the marathon which I’ve never done before and started winding some time back on Cam… It was a very different sensation in the back-half of the marathon for me and the training was pretty similar to what I’ve done before so I can definitely attribute a huge part of that to PREPD”
— TIM REED, 2016 IRONMAN 70.3 WORLD CHAMPION

PREPD HELPS BOOST TIM REED TO 2ND PLACE IN IRONMAN AUSTRALIA

Congratulations to PREPD ambassador Tim Reed on an epic performance taking out 2nd place in IRONMAN in Port Macquarie earlier this month. A PB performance in a time of 8:09:50 – almost 7 minutes faster than when he won in 2016!

After heading into the run almost 10 mins behind Cam Wurf after a blisteringly fast bike leg, Reedy chipped away before reigning in an extra five minutes over the last 10k’s. Not quite enough to take out the win but Tim described it as “a clear standout race for me over this distance” and finished with a staggering 2:44 hour marathon!

Just a week later, Reedy backed up with a podium finish in hot and humid conditions in IRONMAN 70.3 Vietnam against a world class field including IRONMAN World Champion Patrick Lange.

“I said if everything went perfectly I could go 8:10 on this course, so it really was close to a perfect day for me”
— TIM REED

“Yeah I was very tempted (to try and chase Cam earlier). Ultimately you are still racing yourself over this distance and you don’t want to totally explode by taking too many risks.”

— TIM REED

Interview with Dan Rake

WHAT ARE YOUR CURRENT TRAINING GOALS?

I always like to use the early part of each year to set up a base level of strength and fitness for the year. Work is a little quieter, the family are around and I have more time for back to back strength and endurance sessions. Nothing too fast, just some long slow sessions. It is also a great time to have a social ride with friends. Being based in Melbourne my favourite loops are down the Mornington Peninsula – ride to the top of Arthurs seat and then head down the back side through Red Hill and the wine region. The hills out through the Dandenong’s are beautiful at this time of the year – head out before it gets too hot, it is always a bit cooler as you go higher and there is great tree coverage for some shade. It goes without saying that there is plenty of time swimming in the bay and beaches. I did the Australia Day swim at Brighton and a few other open water events. My favourites swimming beaches being my home surf club at Brighton and Mills Beach down in Mornington.

WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT FOR YOUR PREPARATION LEADING INTO COMPETITION?

When planning for a race, especially if you have a full IRONMAN like Port Macquarie in mind, the work you do to build your leg strength is vital. Get into the hills for your riding and running. Find a group to train with – it will keep you accountable, push you along and add a social element. Try to use public holiday long weekends put in a super session over multiple days. And remember recovery is the fourth leg of IRONMAN – massage, hydration and nutrition are vital.

HOW DO YOU APPROACH HYDRATION?

When it’s hot, I ensure that I increase the amount of sodium I have in my bottles during a session as sweat rates will be higher and so too will sodium and electrolyte losses. I like to freeze my water bottles before a ride and let them defrost as I go so I always have a cool drink. I take additional electrolyte tablets to drop into water refills along the way. I weigh myself before I head out for a long session (especially in the heat) and then again when I get back. Make sure you measure both times without clothes so you don’t have absorbed fluid in your clothes – especially important on the weigh in post workout. This helps me see how effective my hydration has been during exercise and gives an indication of what I’ll need to drink in the next few hours to replace what I’ve lost, noting that 1kg is around 1L of lost fluid.

HOW HAVE YOU INTEGRATED PREPD INTO YOUR TRAINING AND COMPETITION ROUTINE AND WHAT DIFFERENCE HAS IT MADE TO YOUR PERFORMANCE AND RECOVERY?

I use PREPD Prime before any session last 2 hours or more. I’ll typically drink it the night before a morning session – around 12 hours before exercise. I have a relatively high sweat rate and hydration has been an issue for me in the past. When I started using PREPD I noticed my weight loss post a workout dropped from up to 500gms/hr to being almost negligible. My absorption and retention of fluid measurably improved. I don’t do a long session now without getting PREPD beforehand and having Recover afterwards.

Q&A with Emily Watts

WHAT ARE YOUR CURRENT TRAINING GOALS?

The last few months have been the busiest cycling period yet for me with Australian Track Teams pursuit, Australian Road Nationals and then two UCI International events; Tour Down Under and Cadel’s Great Ocean Road Race. I will look to build on the experience that I have gained from this summer and take it into the domestic season with my Sydney Uni Staminade Team. This year will be my last at School and will be looking to continue my development and dream of pursuing more international racing and of course have fun doing it.

WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT FOR YOUR PREPARATION LEADING INTO COMPETITION?

I try to be very organised and structure my preparation before a competition, there is so much to think of; equipment, taper, nutrition and of course hydration, where PREPD has provided a real advantage. I believe that when you are ready well in advance, it reduces stress, gives you time to focus and feel prepared to race. You know you have done everything to prepare for the event and compete at your best.

HOW DO YOU APPROACH HYDRATION?

I honestly believe that my preparation and hydration plan was what made the difference over my summer of cycling. It started back in November last year, where my coach put me through a heat training program which prepared my body and mind for the increased heat and fatigue that I would encounter in January. During this time I also worked with a nutritionist calculating sweat rates and fuelling the body. With temperatures over 40 encountered on several race days in a multi stage tour, I believe it was my hydration plan with PREPD and Staminade that enabled me to back up for the next stage. During the race you have three sources of fluid, what you start with, from the vehicle and from the feedzone handed to you. I often came back from the vehicle with over 4 bottles to hand out to my team mates. After meeting with the PREPD team before the Tour Down Under, I refined how I can best use the two-step PREPD system to boost hydration on race day. I ensured I went into the tour hydrated and used PREPD Prime before going to sleep, hydrated during the event and then had the Recover in my recovery bag that I had access to straight after the event.

HOW HAVE YOU INTEGRATED PREPD INTO YOUR TRAINING AND COMPETITION ROUTINE AND WHAT DIFFERENCE HAS IT MADE TO YOUR PERFORMANCE AND RECOVERY?

Utilising performance and recovery methods allows me to be able to perform at my peak and push my limits. PREPD allows my hydration to be replenished to back up after multiple days of exertion and makes it easier to manage my hydration over races. I think that PREPD will also be as much of an advantage in the cooler months as during summer because hydration is often overlooked in these conditions. During cooler months many sessions are indorrs and can be very intense and depleting in terms of the fluid loss. I have found that the advantage of PREPD is key for both my training and in racing. Considering how many back-to-back intense training sessions I have in my routine, the ability to train harder and recover faster with PREPD is key to my race preparation. Naturally it is always critical to train as you race.

Q&A with Rebecca Butler

WHAT ARE YOUR TRAINING GOALS FOR SUMMER 2019?

This summer I am focused predominantly on mileage and elevation for rough trail mountain endurance races later in the year. At the same time however I am focused on building speed momentum post my 200+milers in the 2nd half of 2018 that saw me slow down in order to go further.

WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT FOR YOUR PREPARATION LEADING INTO COMPETITION?

What is most important for me leading into competition is maintaining balance, strength, perspective and purpose.

As athletes, we participate in races as a complete self that consists of our commitment to and intensity of our training, our every single day of hydration and nutrition, recovery, our attention to our body and our mind, how we deal with our responsibilities, our ambitions and our own story. We are a complete self. David Suzuki tells a story about a particular ecosystem in the USA Pacific North West and how the delicate ecosystem that exists between the sea and the forests, fish, microbes and bear, is broken apart and “managed” by distinct government departments, including the Department of Water, the Department of Forest Services, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Environmental Protection, the Department of Water Services and so on. The balanced ecosystem is suddenly disconnected and it is the same with humans. As athletes we need to connect back to our internal ecosystem so that when we make our way to the start line our mind and body is interconnected. Injuries, aches and pains, gut issues, hydration and fuelling, training and recovery, motivation, joy, concentration and run mojo: are all connected and all equally part of our athletic self. We can’t blame an injury or gut issues for a lack of race success for we are that injury or that gut issue. If we train hard but ignore an injury or adequate daily fuelling, or gut health, our trained self is an injured trained self, or a poorly hydrated or nourished trained self.

In consideration of this, I am aware that what is most important to me, in a lead up to competition is balancing the elements of the mind and the body that creates a complete trained me.

HOW DO YOU APPROACH HYDRATION OVER THE SUMMER?

I drink a reasonable quantity of water during the day but probably only as much as most healthy people.  When I am out for my long days and/or hard days I usually only take water with me and some fuel such as Pure gels or Cliff blocks and real food.  I don’t feel like I need much when I am out there.
During the day I will often also have an electrolyte drink such as Nuun.  I will also have a protein shake using Infinit RAW and perhaps a Tailwind Rebuild.

HOW HAVE YOU INTEGRATED PREPD INTO YOUR TRAINING AND COMPETITION ROUTINE AND WHAT DIFFERENCE HAS IT MADE TO YOUR PERFORMANCE AND RECOVERY?

Generally I take PREPD Prime two to three times a week before hard training sessions and I follow up with PREPD Recover after each of those sessions.

Since taking PREPD I have noticed that my general hydration levels have changed substantially. In very hot weather I am able to maintain good levels of exertion even on low fuel. My training is consistently improving without becoming as easily fatigued and I am better able to push through the burn that often accompanies hard climbing sessions. On PREPD I am not feeling like I need to take long periods of recovery or take on intermittent mild weeks as I previously did.

But PREPD is doing more than making my hydration, endurance and recovery work better for me. The prebiotic qualities of PREPD, along with my natural food intake, has restored my gut health which has meant my body is absorbing nutrients better, is becoming better nourished and therefore also keeping my mind sharp, focused and alert.

PREPD is now an important part of the ecosystem that is my trained self.

Hydration strategies for UCI Pro cyclists

ABOUT KEVIN POULTON (HEAD COACH – TEAM KATUSHA)

Kevin Poulton is the Head Coach of UCI Pro Cycling Team Katusha Alpecin and Founder of Powerhouse Cycling.

With 20 years of coaching experience, and victories in Paris-Roubaix 2016, Grand Tour stage wins, World Tour Classics and many podium places at World Tour level, Kevin understands the planning, science and training required to win the biggest cycling races.

HOW IMPORTANT IS ADEQUATE HYDRATION FOR UCI PRO CYCLISTS AND WHAT IS THE IMPACT OF DEHYDRATION ON RIDERS?

Because the majority of racing lasts 4 – 7 hours, there is a real risk of the athletes suffering from dehydration. We know that fluid loss of just 2% is going to have huge effect on the athlete’s ability to perform. This means that all the hard work an athlete puts into preparing for a race can easily be undone by a poor hydration strategy on race day.

WHAT IS A TYPICAL HYDRATION AND RACE FUELLING PROTOCOL FOR RIDERS DURING A MULTI-DAY EVENT?

A large part of our race strategy involves consuming enough carbohydrates to match the required workload. With this in mind, we are able to combine hydration and carbohydrate intake into the nutritional plan for the race. Prior to competition, each athlete has had their sweat rate tested, so we always have a target hydration strategy to match this. Generally, we are aiming for each rider to consume a 500ml carbohydrate mix every hour. Post-race, athletes are consuming a recovery drink which also aides in rehydration ready for the next day of competition.

WHEN DID YOU FIRST COME ACROSS PREPD AND WHAT RESPONSE DID YOU SEE FROM THE ATHLETES WHO TRIALLED IT?

I was first introduced to PREPD through a friend who knew I was about to conduct a pre-Vuelta training camp in Andorra during the height of Summer in 2018. I had conducted my research on PREPD and knew what the supposed benefits were. However, going into the camp I didn’t explain to the athlete in detail what he could expect to experience. I wanted to trial PREPD without giving away what we were looking for from the product. To my amazement, everything PREPD expected the athlete to experience with the product, he was conveying the same messages back to me. Most notably, he was strong in the final hour of training. He commented that he didn’t feel the need to drink as often, and there were less bathroom stops during the long training sessions. At the same time, I was monitoring pre and post exercise weight and I was very pleased with the minimal amount of fluid loss experienced despite the high temperatures.

HOW DID PREPD FIT INTO THEIR NORMAL HYDRATION ROUTINE?

PREPD complimented our existing hydration strategy. We still had the need to take on carbohydrates during exercise to avoid decreased performance. For the athlete, implementing the use of PREPD pre and post training into the daily hydration strategy was seamless.

WITH ONGOING USE SINCE INITIAL TRIALS, WHAT KIND OF HYDRATION DIFFERENCES HAVE YOU SEEN WITH PRO CYCLISTS USING PREPD?

The key difference we continue to see with Pro cyclists using PREPD is less reduction in post exercise weight through better hydration. This reduced fluid loss is resulting in a stronger performance by the athlete especially in the later stages of racing.