The journey to winning Geelong 70.3, and how you can too achieve your PBs.

Steve McKenna recently came 1st at the 2021 Geelong 70.3 race and here it is a bit of his story and motivation on how he got there, and how you too can achieve your own goals.

…After historically having terrible luck at Geelong 70.3 (or just poor performances), this one meant a lot and confirmed that the Geelong curse is now long gone!

In 2016 my first ever attempt at the IRONMAN 70.3 distance went horribly wrong and like many races in my first year taking on triathlon it ended up in the back of an ambulance.

I learnt how to swim and ride a bike in 2015 after these two sports were all I could do to rehabilitate a badly broken leg playing aussie rules football (15 weeks on crutches), ambitiously I pulled back on everything in life and decided this would be my job no matter what.

A lot of this confidence came from my first ever triathlon coach Matty White who took me under his wing and said “I’d bet my house on the fact that you’ll go PRO”, that was enough for me, pulled back on University, quit landscaping, got an office job sitting on my arse and started pretending I was a Professional within weeks of my first every triathlon.

Just 12months later I went to Geelong in search of a Pro license, with a Pro field of almost 30 that day I swam 11th quickest overall (23.48min) and cycled 14th (2hrs15), I then ran into around 10-12th place on the run leg and passed out at the 14km mark.

Passing out was a common theme throughout my childhood running long distance at a national level and within my first 12months doing triathlon the theme continued with 3 hospital trips.

My parents often wrote my name, DOB and emergency contact details on my racing bibs – always expecting the worst and pleading with me to pull back a little before the race. Matty White and my current coach can confirm that I don’t have a great gauge on perceived effort, but now that I am very familiar with the ‘passing out sensations’ and when I’m getting close to this zone, being able to push this hard is now a big strength rather than a weakness initially.

After this experience in Geelong I built the race up to be something bigger than it was and under performed in my next two trips here, pulling out overwhelmed and then badly under performing.

In 2020 I was coming off the back of a great 2019 and confidence was high, so things were going well sitting at the front of the chase pack behind leaders Amberger and Appelton. I knew I was on to perform to my potential that day but at the 30km mark my SRAM electric gearing lost it s#it and I was on the side of the road for 5minutes trying to fix the issue. Giving up I took the batteries off and rode the bike as a fixie with 1 gear!

2021 was much different with a coming of age and an apprenticeship in the sport finally finished now! There’s still a lot to work on and I’m not completely satisfied with the performance, which might be the case with anyone aiming high, but all I know is that it felt bloody good and that I learnt from a tactical running error a few weeks earlier at Husky Aussie champs – this time I bought a watch and paced the run well with an even 1st and 2nd run laps averaging 3.22 per km off a solid swim+bike.

Coach Tim Reed (Reedy) has had us both training for Ironman Australia so the fatigue was high coming into this race but we’re both extremely fit and strong from the training so a 1st and 3rd for us was a pleasant surprise!

Reedy is also partnered up with PREPD HYDRATION and even in cooler condition our hydration advantage on the rest of the field certainly plays a big role in our minds.

In our training leading into Geelong we’ve been having PREPD almost every day and the hydration not only allows for better and longer training days but is also recovering us significantly faster. 

 

Just two days after the race I’m right back into training longer again (aerobically for now), but in less than 2 weeks I’m racing Challenge Shepparton, 2 weeks after that I’m racing IM Australia and 4 weeks after that IM Cairns!

My partner and I are due to have our first child in July so I’m not taking any racing for granted and this busy schedule is me making the most of the time I have left in 2021 with maximal sleep time and recovery. I’ve been reassured by many that we’ll handle it just fine, but I’m still going to keep using it as an excuse to train and race like a psychopath until June… being I love it.

To those out there trying to balance work, kids, studies and too much Ironman/endurance training along with pre race nerves these are some of my top tips:

1.Stress less about whether you’re ready or going to get that PB and  enjoy the process because triathlon is bloody fun.

2.It’s all about consistency, if life gets busy but you still found a little time each day to keep ticking boxes and destress with training then you’re still on track. There’s always plenty more races if one preparation went wrong and that long term consistency through the busy times will pay off eventually if you make lifestyle changes permanent and similarly to me.

3.Sleeping well is extremely important.

4.Hydrate all day everyday (and top off your hydration with PREPD).

It doesn’t matter whether you just want to finish your first half marathon, or want to compete in an Ironman, or just simply want to do your cycling training for longer and recover faster. Completely change the way you train and race with PREPD’s unparalleled hydration. Get PREPD today and achieve your OWN goals.

Prepd- Man running

Out Run COVID – Michael Case

YOU ARE AN AVID PREPD USER, HOW DID YOU FIRST DISCOVER PREPD?

I have been following the process of Steve McKenna. From when he first started out in triathlon to going pro. Steve trusted in his results as an athlete and he truly believed PREPD worked for him. As an athlete, you listen to other athletes and their trust in a product, it makes you want to try it too.

WHY DID YOU START THE “OUT RUN COVID, THE BENEFITS OF RUNNING” CAMPAIGN ON YOUR INSTAGRAM ACCOUNT?

I don’t use Instagram to gain followers. I have been in the fitness industry for years and really enjoy running. When Covid hit, I could see the fear in not knowing what to do and the feeling of hopelessness. Suddenly everyone couldn’t go out, see friends and family and go to the gym. But we could run.  It’s always hard to know what to do, but one thing I know for sure, is that exercise will always be the best option for for physical and mental health. Running is one of the greatest gifts we have. It is truly universal, (almost) everyone can do it and it’s easily done in isolation.

I am lucky enough to have been a part of hundreds and hundreds of running journeys (with clients) over the years; as much as I love programming athletes and recreational runners to improve and enjoy their running more, my greatest joy comes from inspiring others to take up running in whatever form suits their body, circumstances and goals.

Now more than ever, we need to inspire others to find a way to lace up, step outside (safely) and feel the joy of running. So I decided to post one running photo a day with a different benefit of what running can do for you. It’s a project I feel strongly about and one that I hope people share to help others through this strange time. If it inspires, educates, resonates or helps anyone in anyway, it will be entirely worth it.

WHAT WAS THE REACTION/S TO THE CAMPAIGN?

I had a lot of private messages from friends, family and former clients saying thank you for getting them motivated and inspired to run again or just to try running for the first time. Some of the people who contacted me had never spoken to me about running, were now talking to me and asking me lots of questions about running. I tried to educate them on key points about running from their questions. Like “which pair of shoes should I buy?” I would recommend that they get properly fitted and not worry about the brand or colour they wear, but rather about what shoe is best for their foot and running style.

Also running doesn’t mean hurting. A lot of people would consider running as a painful exercise, but talking to them I could explain that even a gentle jog is a great way to run.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE THING ABOUT RUNNING?

The mental health side of running is my favourite benefit of running. I find running a stress relief and it gives me happiness. There is nothing like a tough week at work and then going for a run. That feeling of all just melting away.

YOU’VE BEEN IN THE FITNESS INDUSTRY FOR A LONG TIME NOW. ARE THERE SKILLS OR THINGS YOU’VE LEARNT FROM TRIATHLON TRAINING THAT ARE TRANSFERABLE INTO YOUR DAY TO DAY ROLE?

The main skills that are transferable are consistency, dedication and commitment. As a personal trainer and a triathlete you must keep up your training, over a long period of time. You also need the support of your family and friends. Client rapport is the same.

ARE YOU ABLE TO TELL US ABOUT AN AVERAGE DAY FOR YOU & YOUR FITNESS ROUTINE?

Even before covid a usual day doesn’t exist for me. But I try to train 3-4 hours a day (or 20-24 hours per week). Every morning and every evening, I will run, ride, swim or gym. Covid means that servicing clients is more online now with new software and videos.

Nutrition is key and involves a lot of eating (oats, yoghurt, fruit, veggies, meat and pasta). An easy session means I will drink lots of water and fluid during the day but a hard session means I need PREPD. I drink a PREPD Prime as my dessert after a meal and it’s even more delicious with the chocolate flavour now! The PREPD Recover is my favourite part of finishing training.

HOW DID YOU GET INTO TRIATHLONS AND IRONMAN?

I did my first duathlon at the age of 18 years old and my first triathlon in my early 20s. I remember getting into the pool and the length was 25 metres. I thought I was going to drown,  even though I could stand up, I still felt the panic! So I was no good at the start but I kept going and kept training, until I could.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE THINKING ABOUT DOING THEIR FIRST IRONMAN?

I think that people all give advice which relates to them. I remember when I went to my first Ironman and I heard Liz Blatchford interviewed live on stage (an English professional triathlete). Liz placed third at the 2013 and 2015 Ironman World Championships, so I was really interested in what she had to say. She was asked the same question of what advice would you give someone thinking about doing their first Ironman?

Liz’s answer helped me the very next day, when my bike gears broke and the weather blew in hard. “Just aim to finish the race. Anything can go wrong on the day and it’s a long event, so don’t worry about times or where you are in the race, just finish. If you cross that finish line, you will forever be an Ironman and no one can take that away from you. So just aim to finish. Then next time you can time it.”

DO YOU HAVE SOMEONE WHO YOU FOLLOW ONLINE OR A PROGRAM THAT HELPS YOU TO MEET YOUR GOALS?

Matty White is my coach and the support I need, as I can coach myself to a point, but Matty gives me programs that he knows I can do, but need.

IN THE WORLD OF TRIATHLONS, WHAT IS ON YOUR BUCKET LIST?

#1 – My key goal is to represent Australia at the world championships. I have a watch band that I changed to green and gold. I did it to remind me that when I am struggling and things aren’t going my way in my training, that is why I am doing this. I am almost there and I am going to represent Australia in September 2021.

#2 – 70.3 Championships

#3 – Kona, the holy grail.

TO FIND AND FOLLOW MICHAEL CASE ON INSTAGRAM – SEE THE LINK BELOW

Prepd- Woman putting hands together

From Smoker to 10 time Ironman Finisher

HOW DID YOU GET INTO IRONMAN EVENTS AND ULTRA MARATHONS?

I smoked heavily for over 20 years and finally managed to quit 12 years ago. I started running to get fit and did the Melbourne Marathon in 2010. In 2012 my brother suggested that we (my boyfriend and I) all do the Cairns Ironman 70.3 together. I said, “Sure, what’s an Ironman? How hard can it be?” Well, pretty hard! We trained for nearly a year for the race. I absolutely loved it and the next day my boyfriend and I signed up for the full Ironman in Port Macquarie. We went onto racing 6 more 140.6 and 10 x 70.3 races together around Australia, over the next 7 years.

In 2018 I went onto Lite n Easy and lost 11 kilos and I was even on the Lite n Easy ads around Australia in 2019!  My training and racing improved dramatically.

After the 2019 Pt Macquarie Ironman, I found I had lost my love for the sport but my love for running was still strong, so when we got home from the race, I signed up for the Yurrebilla ultra trail marathon. The race is 56kms of steep, rocky trails through the Adelaide hills.  Again, I had no idea what I was in for, but if training for and finishing 7 Ironman races has taught me anything, it’s that I am made of tough stuff. I finished this ultra and then decided I was ready to tackle Ironman again, so now have my sights set on Ironman Western Australia in December 2020, the day after my 50th birthday.

YOU ARE A 7 TIME IRONMAN FINISHER, 10XHALF IRONMAN FINISHER, AND AN ULTRA MARATHON RUNNER. HOW DO YOU HAVE TIME TO HAVE TIME TO WORK AS PAEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE REGISTERED NURSE?

I’m not quite full time, but I do work a lot of hours! I’m a very focused person and also very stubborn as my boyfriend will attest to! When I put my mind to something, I am single minded about achieving this, and I can honestly say this comes from all my training and racing Ironman. I never realised that I had this kind of determination prior to Ironman.

ARE YOU ABLE TO TELL US ABOUT AN AVERAGE DAY FOR YOU AND YOUR ROUTINE?

On a working day I get up at around 4.20am and run for about 8-9kms before I leave for work and do a 7.00am – 7.30pm shift. I am absolutely exhausted by the time I get home as nursing in Intensive Care is a very physically and emotionally demanding job. I have a glass of wine, eat dinner and go to bed as I usually have to get up and do it all again the next day.

On my days off I usually have a sleep in and then get up and study for a few hours as I’m currently studying my Bachelor of Criminology. I then head out into the trails for a long run, or to the outdoor pool at my gym for a swim no matter the weather. If the weather permits, I’ll go for a ride. I actually prefer swimming and running in winter as I always get a lane to myself at the outdoor pool, but I’m not a huge fan of road riding, so I often train indoors. The trails are so pretty in the colder months and I don’t have to worry about snakes!

WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES IN TRYING TO JUGGLE BOTH ENDURANCE RACING/TRAINING AND WORK?

I have to really prioritise my time and when I make a decision or commit to training and a race, I stick to it. I have very understanding friends and family, as quite often I’m exhausted after working and training and don’t have the energy to catch up as often as we would like. I plan out my weeks and know what I have to do, including study, work and training. I’m quite regimented about it and I’m lucky to have such supportive, wonderful people around me who know how much I get out of my training and racing. I couldn’t do it without them.

The biggest challenge is time. I’m always tired and feel (like many people) that I race from one thing to another. Getting up at 4.20am most mornings isn’t my favourite thing to do, but I always remind myself of how good I feel when I’m racing and cross that line to the words “Kate Allan, you are an Ironman”. It is indescribable and addictive. There is no better feeling than being really fit.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE THINKING ABOUT DOING THEIR FIRST IRONMAN, 70.3 OR AN ULTRA MARATHON?

Sign up and do it! If I can do it anyone can! I’ll never win, in fact I’m often near the back of the pack but that isn’t what it’s about in my mind. Ironman and Ultras have taught me that I can do anything I put my mind to. It has given me so much confidence in my choices and decisions in life, and I am a better person for it. When you push your body and mind to the absolute limit over a 15-hour race, not to mention all the months of training leading up to it, you find that you are capable of more than you ever imagined. It has transferred to other areas in my life – I’m back studying again and have taken steps in my career that I hadn’t thought possible prior to Ironman.

If you want to do it, sign up and commit to it. Prepare to suffer and prepare to sacrifice, but it’s worth it. Set yourself training goals every day over the weeks and months leading to the race and stick to them. Tell people you’re doing it. I find that if I tell friends and family of my plans, then I’m more accountable and have to do it! Thank those around you who support you and understand your complete and utter obsession with Ironman and Ultras, because trust me, it will happen. It’s like a drug. Enjoy the day, smile and thank all the volunteers, be kind, courteous and don’t litter out on the course.

Don’t lose sight of why you’re racing and savour every moment.

IF YOU HAD TO CHOOSE, WHICH IS YOUR FAVOURITE – TRIATHLON RACING OR RACING AN ULTRA MARATHON AND WHY?

Definitely Ironman, hands down. There is no better feeling than crossing that line with the lights, music pumping and hundreds of people cheering. Running down that finishers shute are without doubt the greatest moments of my life. I will never forget that feeling. It makes the hundreds and hundreds of hours of training and sacrifice worth it.

I absolutely love ultra-trail running too. Funnily enough I love the training as much if not more than the race itself.  Running for hours on trails in the hills, seeing no one but birds, kangaroos and koalas is the best way to spend a day, but Ironman will always be my true love.

HOW MUCH OF AN ISSUE IS DEHYDRATION FOR YOU AND WHAT ARE THE IMPACTS?

Obviously when you are racing for 15 hours dehydration is a massive concern, especially in some of the places we race like Western Australia where it is hot and dry. I sometimes train for up to 6 hours at a time so I have to think about how I’m going to best hydrate and fuel my body.

HOW DO YOU MANAGE YOUR HYDRATION AND NUTRITION DURING TRAINING?

If I’m heading out for a session that will be over 2 hours I’ll wear my hydration vest and also pack nutrition bars, peanut butter sandwiches, bananas etc. I always use PREPD, electrolyte powders on longer sessions and then PREPD recovery powder when I get home.

IN THE WORLD OF ULTRA MARATHON RACING AND TRIATHLONS, WHAT IS ON YOUR BUCKET LIST?

I would love to get to the Ironman World Championships in Kona, Hawaii one day.

I would also like to finish the Ultra Five in South Australia. This is five ultra trail marathons over the year. Not many people are able to finish the whole series as it’s incredibly taxing on the body. I had signed up for the series this year, but Covid had other plans. Maybe 2021?

Training & nutrition during COVID-19 with Abbey Lewis

EXERCISE AND MENTAL HEALTH

We all understand that exercise supports our physical & mental health and being active can not only keep us healthy, it can also help us fight off infection. Exercise boosts our mental health, and during this challenging time of uncertainly it’s more important than ever to keep our minds clear and focused.

 

 

With all immediate races being cancelled you might be lacking motivation but there is no better time to put in the work, as it will provide a springboard to an even better training/racing cycle later in the year. Training for triathlons during this time is challenging and you will need to think outside the box, step outside that box, do things you wouldn’t normally do, and keep pushing forward!

 

As well as maintaining our training plans, it’s also just as imperative to pay attention to our diet and nutritional status during the COVID-19 pandemic.  By utilising PREPD you will be enhancing your normal hydration strategy which is especially helpful if you are maintaining your training intensity or amplifying it!

Plus, the prebiotic nature of the resistant starch in PREPD supports good gut health and your immune system.

HERE’S SOME TIPS ON HOW TO INCLUDE PREPD INTO YOUR TRAINING REGIME

BREAKFAST Blueberry & Vanilla Oats

  • Oats
  • Flaxseeds
  • Chia Seeds
  • Banana
  • Blueberries
  • 3.25 LEVEL SCOOPS of PRIME Vanilla Powder
  • Almond Milk

*MIX TOGETHER and cook on the stove top or if you’re in a hurry zap it in the microwave for 3mins

 

Post Training Shake

  • Ice
  • 2.5 LEVEL SCOOPS of RECOVER Chocolate Powder
  • Water

*BLEND TOGETHER and drink

 

Dessert (or a sweet treat)

  • Chobani
  • 2.5 LEVEL SCOOPS of RECOVER Chocolate Powder
  • Xo crunch

*MIX TOGETHER

 

ON THE GO

I always keep a few bottles of PREPD PRIME & PREPD RECOVER in the fridge for when I am in rush between training sessions.  My top tip is that the bottles are the perfect fit for your back pocket when out on the bike- my favourite flavour is strawberry & kiwi!

Ironman – Steve McKenna’s favourite indoor training session

WHAT IS YOUR ROUTINE BEFORE TRAINING, HOW DOES IT HELP PREPARE YOU FOR LONGER TRAINING SESSIONS?

With no racing coming up, now is a great time to get some long, unstructured aerobic training days in. Riding, swimming and running are my obvious choices!

 

Prime Smoothie @ 8.30pm
More often than not, I will train in the morning, so the night prior I will make myself a PREPD Prime Smoothie, in preparation for the long day ahead.
  • 3.25 x scoops of PREPD Prime powder (Vanilla)
  • 1 x banana
  • Soy milk/water

 

Recover Smoothie @ 8.00am (or straight after training)
After every training session I will make myself another PREPD Recover Smoothie, to help my muscles recover from the session and enables me to get on with my work day.
  • 2.5 x scoops of PREPD Recover protein powder (Chocolate)
  • 1 x handful of mixed frozen berries
  • Soy milk/water

This combination of using both the PREPD Prime and Recover powders gives me that extra protein, electrolytes and hydration, to aid my body in recovery, so I can back up the sessions daily. I also know that the probiotic nature of the resistant starch in PREPD supports my gut health and immune system.

WHAT INDOOR SESSION DO YOU RECOMMEND NOW, WITH SOCIAL ISOLATION?

This is one of the sessions Reedy (Ironman Tim Reed – also Steve McKenna’s coach) has set for me in the past and I love it. Even though I didn’t create it… it’s still my all time personal favourite session.

75min indoor cycling session – bang for buck!!
  • 15-20min warm up building from zone 1 heart rate to zone 2 heart rate.
  • 4 x 8min (as 4min grinding 50-60 cadence @ 4.2watts/kg, 4min just above 70.3 race power @ 4.8watts/kg).
  • 2 x min rest in between each 8 min effort.
  • 15min cool down.
Takeout:
  • For me at 66kg this equates to 280watts for the first 4mins and 320watts for the second 4min.
  • Bang for buck – getting both strength work in, along with some upper aerobic work.
  • Getting used to pushing just above race power on tired legs (straight after a leg burning strength effort).
This will be extremely useful in many race situations, particularly when someone is trying to break away and your legs are shagged….. thinking back to these sessions, its comforting at the time knowing that you can still push good power on tired legs.

A NOTE FOR INDOOR TRAINING HYDRATION > FROM PREPD

“With the increase of indoor training volume, my riders are more susceptible to dehydration. It is very easy to lose 2-3 kg in a 1 hour indoor workout. With this in mind, I have the riders weigh themselves before and after a workout about once a week. This way they can get a gauge of how much they sweat they are losing from a particular ride. This is where PREPD is going to provide them with a definite advantage to their performance by enhancing their normal hydration strategy.” – Kevin Poulton (renowned UCI Cycling Coach). To read more – click here.

PREPD TEST LAB – Bicycling Australia, Article Karen Forman

BIKE RIDERS LOVE ‘NEW’

– new bikes, new kit and new products. But sometimes we find a product that we like, that works for us, and we don’t really want to change things up, especially when it comes to personal aspects such as hydration.

Asked to review another new hydration product not so long after I spent a month drinking a brand that I liked enough to take it to France on a recent trip for Bicycling Australia, I wondered… really? Can there be anything better than this? What could be different about PREPD?

Then I spent some time chatting with Nathan Hocking and his team and learnt a thing or two about this new product. Namely, it isn’t a hydration drink, but actually a hydration enhancer. So that idea is very new. It meant I didn’t have to quit drinking the product I had decided was ‘my’ hydration drink. I could still have it, but add PREPD to my before and after exercise regime.

The theory was that PREPD, which tastes like a very nice fruit smoothie (the mango and passionfruit Prime is taken six to 12 hours before training or racing while the equally as flavoursome strawberry and kiwi Recover is taken straight afterwards) works with other forms of hydration in my body (including water), enhancing their absorption. And as most riders know, with better hydration, an athlete can minimise dehydration, sustain training/racing efforts, recover better and reduce the risk of heat stroke on super-hot summer days. With that information, I was keen to try some for myself and even hauled the road bike out of storage after a snowy winter to get out there, sweat a bit in the spring sunshine, and see if it worked.

A MAJOR ADVANCEMENT
Until recently, we have not seen any substantial advances in hydration technology since sports drinks were invented. PREPD professes to change this by significantly increasing the absorption of all fluids consumed by athletes.

Backed by 20-plus years of research and testing through Flinders and Yale Universities, PREPD, as mentioned above consumed pre- and postexercise, has been proven to boost the absorption of leading sports drinks and water. Interestingly, the Prime is taken a minimum of six hours before you clip in and with its smoothie-like texture, minimal sugar and a pleasant flavour, isn’t bad as a night cap the night before a morning ride.

So how does it work? Why is it so different? The team at PREPD explained they use patent-pending resistant starch formulations; this specific resistance starch has been proven through research to enhance fluid and electrolyte absorption in the gut. As many of us have experienced, often most inconveniently while trying to do a PB in a race or sportif, when dehydration sets in it is extremely difficult to rehydrate fast enough to avoid performance deterioration. Nathan from PREPD said the crippling sensation of fatigue towards the end of a long training session or in competition is caused as much by dehydration as from depletion of fuel stores as is commonly to blame.

CLINICAL STUDY

A recent hydration clinical trial of elite AFL players published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition acknowledged that fluid deficits exceeding as little as 1.6% could lead to physical and cognitive impairment in athletes. It found that sport drinks used by athletes were often hyperosmolar; this was known to be suboptimal for rehydration as it did not utilise the absorptive capacity of the large intestine which could be enhanced by fermentative production of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) from substrates such as resistant starch – as utilised by PREPD. The primary outcome markers of hydration were hematocrit (the ratio of the volume of red blood cells to the total volume of blood) and body weight.

Across three time-points, hematocrit was significantly lower and body weight significantly higher in sports drinks compared to maize starch. The study’s conclusion was that the combination of the significantly lower hematocrit and increased body weight in the maize starch group represented better hydration not only at the end of training as well as following a recovery period but also at its commencement. “The magnitude of the benefit seems sufficient to have an impact on performance and further studies to test this possibility are now indicated.” There is strong research to back up PREPD’s claim of enhanced hydration along with a growing number of athletes  using PREPD and experiencing improved hydration and performance benefits.

Riding (and a bit of spring snow skiing) with PREPD for just a week, I wasn’t able to test my hematocrit and didn’t weigh myself, but I found that I didn’t feel as thirsty/obviously dehydrated as I usually do, particularly on the mountain. I am keen to try it again in the hot summer months when I spend hours coaching junior and master’s riders at mostly club level.

WORLDTOUR TESTED

Kevin Poulton is head coach UCI WorldTour Team Katusha Alpecin and has had long-term experience and is a strong advocate of using PREPD. With 20 years of coaching experience, victories in Paris-Roubaix 2016, Grand Tour stage wins, World Tour Classics and many podium places at World Tour level, Kevin understands the planning, science and training required to win the biggest cycling races. He was first introduced to PREPD at a pre-Vuelta training camp in Andorra during the height of summer last year, conducted his own research and knew what the supposed benefits were. “I wanted to trial PREPD without giving away what we were looking for from the product,” he said. “To my amazement, everything PREPD expected the athlete to experience with the product, he was conveying the same messages back to me. Most notably, he was strong in the final hour of training. I was monitoring pre- and post-exercise weight and I was very pleased with the minimal amount of fluid loss experienced despite the high temperatures. “PREPD complimented our existing hydration strategy. For the athlete, implementing the use of PREPD pre- and post-training into the daily hydration strategy was seamless. “The key difference we continue to see with pro cyclists using PREPD is less reduction in post-exercise weight through better hydration. This reduced fluid loss is resulting in a stronger performance by the athlete especially in the later stages of racing.”

Another fan of PREPD is Australian rider Gina Ricardo, who rides for the Sydney Uni- Staminade Women’s Cycling Team. “I first trialled PREPD in training in January 2017 and then continued using it throughout UCI road racing events in the heat of summer,” she says. “I have to say that I truly believe in the product – my performance felt great after drinking Prime and I didn’t experience any cramping at all throughout the January racing calendar despite some really tough and hot conditions.”” PREPD comes as a bottled drink and the recommended retail price for 350ml is $7.50. Riders can order a starter pack online, 2 x Prime & 2 x Recover for $26 including freight. It is also available through a growing number of cycle and sports retailers. BA

More details at www.prepdhydration.com.au

TIM REED’S FINAL PREPARATION FOR THE 2019 IRONMAN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

TIM REED PREPD FOR KONA – CHECK OUT HIS AMAZING VIDEO

Final preparation week for Tim Reed before the Ironman World Championship – Check out Reedy’s reconnaissance training around the spectacular Hawaii Island district of Kona. After a gruelling training camp in Boulder, Colorado, Reedy has been acclimatising to the hot and humid conditions he’ll face on race day. He’s been smashing the training, and also smashing through PREPD, so much so that we had to ship out more product to his training base.

Off the back of a successful 2019, Reedy looks primed to make a big impact at Kona. We wish him all the best in his 2019 quest for success at the IRONMAN World Championship.

The team at PREPD are stoked to announce our continuing partnership with Tim Reed in 2020.  Reedy is an outstanding athlete and great person, we love the journey he’s taken us on. Go Reedy…!

PREPD helps boost Tim Reed to 2nd place in IRONMAN Australia

IRONMAN AUSTRALIA 2019 – FULL POST-RACE INTERVIEW WITH TIM REED

“Having had PREPD the night before, I was holding pace in the final 10k’s of the marathon which I’ve never done before and started winding some time back on Cam… It was a very different sensation in the back-half of the marathon for me and the training was pretty similar to what I’ve done before so I can definitely attribute a huge part of that to PREPD”
— TIM REED, 2016 IRONMAN 70.3 WORLD CHAMPION

PREPD HELPS BOOST TIM REED TO 2ND PLACE IN IRONMAN AUSTRALIA

Congratulations to PREPD ambassador Tim Reed on an epic performance taking out 2nd place in IRONMAN in Port Macquarie earlier this month. A PB performance in a time of 8:09:50 – almost 7 minutes faster than when he won in 2016!

After heading into the run almost 10 mins behind Cam Wurf after a blisteringly fast bike leg, Reedy chipped away before reigning in an extra five minutes over the last 10k’s. Not quite enough to take out the win but Tim described it as “a clear standout race for me over this distance” and finished with a staggering 2:44 hour marathon!

Just a week later, Reedy backed up with a podium finish in hot and humid conditions in IRONMAN 70.3 Vietnam against a world class field including IRONMAN World Champion Patrick Lange.

“I said if everything went perfectly I could go 8:10 on this course, so it really was close to a perfect day for me”
— TIM REED

“Yeah I was very tempted (to try and chase Cam earlier). Ultimately you are still racing yourself over this distance and you don’t want to totally explode by taking too many risks.”

— TIM REED

Interview with Dan Rake

WHAT ARE YOUR CURRENT TRAINING GOALS?

I always like to use the early part of each year to set up a base level of strength and fitness for the year. Work is a little quieter, the family are around and I have more time for back to back strength and endurance sessions. Nothing too fast, just some long slow sessions. It is also a great time to have a social ride with friends. Being based in Melbourne my favourite loops are down the Mornington Peninsula – ride to the top of Arthurs seat and then head down the back side through Red Hill and the wine region. The hills out through the Dandenong’s are beautiful at this time of the year – head out before it gets too hot, it is always a bit cooler as you go higher and there is great tree coverage for some shade. It goes without saying that there is plenty of time swimming in the bay and beaches. I did the Australia Day swim at Brighton and a few other open water events. My favourites swimming beaches being my home surf club at Brighton and Mills Beach down in Mornington.

WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT FOR YOUR PREPARATION LEADING INTO COMPETITION?

When planning for a race, especially if you have a full IRONMAN like Port Macquarie in mind, the work you do to build your leg strength is vital. Get into the hills for your riding and running. Find a group to train with – it will keep you accountable, push you along and add a social element. Try to use public holiday long weekends put in a super session over multiple days. And remember recovery is the fourth leg of IRONMAN – massage, hydration and nutrition are vital.

HOW DO YOU APPROACH HYDRATION?

When it’s hot, I ensure that I increase the amount of sodium I have in my bottles during a session as sweat rates will be higher and so too will sodium and electrolyte losses. I like to freeze my water bottles before a ride and let them defrost as I go so I always have a cool drink. I take additional electrolyte tablets to drop into water refills along the way. I weigh myself before I head out for a long session (especially in the heat) and then again when I get back. Make sure you measure both times without clothes so you don’t have absorbed fluid in your clothes – especially important on the weigh in post workout. This helps me see how effective my hydration has been during exercise and gives an indication of what I’ll need to drink in the next few hours to replace what I’ve lost, noting that 1kg is around 1L of lost fluid.

HOW HAVE YOU INTEGRATED PREPD INTO YOUR TRAINING AND COMPETITION ROUTINE AND WHAT DIFFERENCE HAS IT MADE TO YOUR PERFORMANCE AND RECOVERY?

I use PREPD Prime before any session last 2 hours or more. I’ll typically drink it the night before a morning session – around 12 hours before exercise. I have a relatively high sweat rate and hydration has been an issue for me in the past. When I started using PREPD I noticed my weight loss post a workout dropped from up to 500gms/hr to being almost negligible. My absorption and retention of fluid measurably improved. I don’t do a long session now without getting PREPD beforehand and having Recover afterwards.

PREPD: the Official IRONMAN Oceania Fluid Absorption Series Partner

OFFICIAL IRONMAN FLUID ABSORPTION PARTNER – 2018/19 OCEANIA SERIES

We are excited to announce that PREPD is the Official Fluid Absorption Partner for the 2018/2019 IRONMAN Oceania Series. With the duration and intensity of exertion in IRONMAN events, competitors face enormous hydration challenges, which can significantly impair performance. The partnership will see athletes provided with PREPD products in aid and recovery stations at selected IRONMAN Oceania events to help boost hydration when they need it most.

“We are delighted to welcome PREPD to the IRONMAN partnership family. Athlete satisfaction and enjoyment is at the core of everything we do. Given the time and sacrifice our athletes dedicate to competing in our events, I am really pleased we can offer them a hydration specialist in PREPD to use pre and post events.”

— MILES ROLES, HEAD OF PARTNERSHIPS IRONMAN OCEANIA

IRONMAN WESTERN AUSTRALIA

The IRONMAN Western Australia races in Busselton, WA on 2nd Dec 2018 will be PREPD’s inaugural event and launch to the IRONMAN community. The Busselton IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 events have seen tremendous growth, both in size and reputation among the triathlon community, and are widely recognised globally as being world-class.

With the following feedback from 2x Kona finisher and IRONMAN certified coach, Stuart Harsley, we encourage all IRONMAN WA competitors to trial PREPD well in advance of the race to gain a competitive edge in what is likely to be hot conditions on race-day.

“Using PREPD in the 2018 IRONMAN World Championships in Kona, Hawaii, I was able to consume and absorb noticeably more fluid without any gut issues. The hydration boost was so significant that I was even able to comfortably take on more energy gels than normal. After completing the event with a PB and breaking the 11-hour mark, I would recommend PREPD to any endurance athlete looking for an edge.”
— STUART HARSLEY – 2X KONA FINISHER, IRONMAN CERTIFIED COACH

As part of our partnership with IRONMAN, Busselton event competitors will also receive an exclusive discount code (stay to tuned to the IRONMAN WA event Facebook page and emails) to make better hydration even more accessible.

If you are attending the IRONMAN Western Australia event, come and visit the PREPD tent in the Village Expo to find out more about how PREPD can boost your hydration and taste PREPD for yourself. We will be in the Expo area from the Thursday 29th November until Saturday 1st December, and then in the Recovery area on Sunday 2nd December for race-day. We look forward to interacting with the amazing IRONMAN community and sharing more about the unique PREPD story.

If you are competing in IRONMAN Western Australia and want to trial PREPD for yourself, contact us directly through Messenger chat on our website if you have any questions or browse the PREPD range here. We can deliver PREPD products to your door within a few days of order, giving you ample time to thoroughly test PREPD in training before making it part of your race-day preparation and recovery plan.

READY. PREPD. GO